Post Undeleted by Dom
    Post Deleted by user546
4 added 1922 characters in body
source | link

Historical background:

Subotnick's recordings first came out in 1967. The problem you have noted with instruments being panned hard-left or hard-right was very common on many recordings in those days.

In the mid-1960s, most record buyers had monaural (mono) "high-fidelity" or "hi-fi" sound systems and turntables and reel-to-reel tape machines that could only play back monaural (mono) recordings, not stereo. Most people had never heard stereo recordings.

There was a time in the mid-1960s when stereo record players andWhen stereo amplifiers and speakerssystems appeared on the market and sold in high numbers. At that time, record labels wanted to sell the new stereo phonographic disks, and the public was eager to buy them.

At this time radio was also transitioning from mono (on the AM band) to stereo (on the FM band) and people were buying the first stereo radio receivers for their homes and cars. 

The problem is that while recording studios would record the music on multi-track tape (often no more thanat this time on 3 or 4 tracks total, or in rare cases in those days 8 tracks) the recording engineers only had experience in mixing down to monaural, and they would deliver the final album masters as a monaural recording. Recording engineers were just beginning to work with stereo equipment which had just been installed in their studios, and they simply had not established any standard methods for mixing stereo sound. Panning instruments or singers' voices hard-left or hard-right was something you find in a great deal of all kinds of recordings from this transitional era, apparently because the mixing engineers didhad not know anythought of a better way to do it.

Probably theThe most famous example is the albums of the Beatles. The albums, starting circa 1963, were recorded on a small number of tracks that were mixed down to monaural and issued as monaural phonograph recordsmono. Stereo was brand-new as a commercial format, and aroundAround 1965, the Beatles' record label asked the Beatles' producer George Martin and his recording engineers to make additional re-mixes of the Beatles in stereo rather than mono. Then certainThe same Beatles albums were releasedcould be bought in a mono phonograph or stereo phonograph version sold alongside the mono phonograph versions.

The stereo re-mixes of the Beatles are notoriously hard to listen to over headphones. All the guitars might be panned hard-right while all the vocals are panned hard left. Or Paul McCartney's lead vocal is panned hard right while all the backingharmony vocals from the other band members are panned hard left, for example. History says that in those daysat first the producer George Martin did not want to involve himself with mixing in stereo, so he supervised the original mono mixes himself but left the stereo remixes to his employees and did not give much thought or attention to the process.

The Beatles did not record a new album that they intended to be listened to in stereo until the Abbey Road album in 1969.

The primitive stereo re-mix versions of the earlier Beatles albums were the only ones available for purchase or played on the radio throughoutpeople to hear from the 1970s until 1982, when a very small limited edition of mono LP phonograph records was released. But generally speaking the public never heardall the original mixesway up until 2009 when a multi-CD box-set collection called The Beatles in Mono was made widely availablereleased.

Since I bought the Beatles in Mono boxed set, I'm like you: I can't stand to listen to the Beatles' primitive stereo mixes anymore, even though the stereo mixes were the only ones I heard my whole life, for about 40 years, until the mono set was released.

Historical background:

Subotnick's recordings first came out in 1967. The problem you have noted with instruments being panned hard-left or hard-right was very common on many recordings in those days.

In the mid-1960s, most record buyers had monaural (mono) "high-fidelity" or "hi-fi" sound systems and turntables and reel-to-reel tape machines that could only play back monaural recordings, not stereo. Most people had never heard stereo recordings.

There was a time in the mid-1960s when stereo record players and stereo amplifiers and speakers appeared on the market and sold in high numbers. At that time, record labels wanted to sell the new stereo phonographic disks, and the public was eager to buy them. The problem is that while recording studios would record the music on multi-track tape (often no more than 3 or 4 tracks total, or in rare cases in those days 8 tracks) the recording engineers only had experience in mixing down to monaural, and they would deliver the final album masters as a monaural recording. Recording engineers were just beginning to work with stereo equipment which had just been installed in their studios, and they simply had not established any standard methods for mixing stereo sound. Panning instruments or singers' voices hard-left or hard-right was something you find in a great deal of all kinds of recordings from this transitional era, apparently because the mixing engineers did not know any better.

Probably the most famous example is the albums of the Beatles. The albums, starting circa 1963, were recorded on a small number of tracks that were mixed down to monaural and issued as monaural phonograph records. Stereo was brand-new as a commercial format, and around 1965, the Beatles' record label asked the Beatles' producer George Martin and his recording engineers to make additional re-mixes of the Beatles in stereo rather than mono. Then certain Beatles albums were released in a stereo phonograph version sold alongside the mono phonograph versions.

The stereo re-mixes of the Beatles are notoriously hard to listen to over headphones. All the guitars might be panned hard-right while all the vocals are panned hard left. Or Paul McCartney's lead vocal is panned hard right while all the backing vocals from the other band members are panned hard left, for example. History says that in those days the producer George Martin did not want to involve himself with mixing in stereo, so he supervised the original mono mixes himself but left the stereo remixes to his employees and did not give much thought or attention to the process.

The Beatles did not record a new album that they intended to be listened to in stereo until the Abbey Road album in 1969.

The primitive stereo re-mix versions of the earlier Beatles albums were the only ones available for purchase or played on the radio throughout the 1970s until 1982, when a very small limited edition of mono LP phonograph records was released. But generally speaking the public never heard the original mixes until 2009 when a multi-CD box-set collection called The Beatles in Mono was made widely available.

Since I bought the Beatles in Mono boxed set, I'm like you: I can't stand to listen to the Beatles' primitive stereo mixes anymore, even though the stereo mixes were the only ones I heard my whole life, for about 40 years, until the mono set was released.

Historical background:

Subotnick's recordings first came out in 1967. The problem you have noted with instruments being panned hard-left or hard-right was very common on many recordings in those days.

In the mid-1960s, most record buyers had monaural (mono) "high-fidelity" or "hi-fi" sound systems and turntables and reel-to-reel tape machines that could only play back monaural (mono) recordings, not stereo.

When stereo systems appeared on the market, record labels wanted to sell the new stereo phonographic disks, and the public was eager to buy them.

At this time radio was also transitioning from mono (on the AM band) to stereo (on the FM band) and people were buying the first stereo radio receivers for their homes and cars. 

The problem is that while recording studios would record the music on multi-track tape (at this time on 3 or 4 tracks, or in rare cases 8 tracks) the recording engineers only had experience in mixing down to monaural, and they would deliver the final album masters as a monaural recording. Recording engineers were just beginning to work with stereo equipment, and they simply had not established any standard methods for mixing stereo sound. Panning instruments or singers' voices hard-left or hard-right was something you find in a great deal of all kinds of recordings from this transitional era, apparently because the mixing engineers had not thought of a better way to do it.

The most famous example is the albums of the Beatles. The albums, starting circa 1963, were recorded on a small number of tracks that were mixed down to mono. Around 1965, the Beatles' record label asked the Beatles' producer George Martin to make additional re-mixes of the Beatles in stereo. The same Beatles albums could be bought in a mono phonograph or stereo phonograph version.

The stereo re-mixes of the Beatles are notoriously hard to listen to over headphones. All the guitars might be panned hard-right while all the vocals are panned hard left. Or Paul McCartney's lead vocal is panned hard right while all the harmony vocals are panned hard left, for example. History says that at first the producer George Martin did not want to involve himself with stereo, so he supervised the original mono mixes but left the stereo remixes to his employees and did not give much attention to the process.

The Beatles did not record a new album that they intended to be listened to in stereo until the Abbey Road album in 1969.

The primitive stereo re-mix versions of the earlier Beatles albums were the only ones available for people to hear from the 1970s all the way up until 2009 when a multi-CD box-set collection called The Beatles in Mono was released.

Since I bought the Beatles in Mono boxed set, I'm like you: I can't stand to listen to the Beatles' primitive stereo mixes anymore, even though the stereo mixes were the only ones I heard my whole life, for about 40 years, until the mono set was released.

3 added 1922 characters in body
source | link

Historical background:

Subotnick's recordings first came out in 1967. The problem you have noted with instruments being panned hard-left or hard-right was very common on many recordings in those days.

In the mid-1960s, most record buyers had monaural (mono) "high-fidelity" or "hi-fi" sound systems and turntables and reel-to-reel tape machines that could only play back monaural recordings, not stereo. Most people had never heard stereo recordings.

There was a time in the mid-1960s when stereo record players and stereo amplifiers and speakers appeared on the market and sold in high numbers. At that time, record labels wanted to sell the new stereo phonographic disks, and the public was eager to buy them. The problem is that while recording studios would record the music on multi-track tape (often no more than 3 or 4 tracks total, or in rare cases in those days 8 tracks) the recording engineers only had experience in mixing down to monaural, and they would deliver the final album masters as a monaural recording. Recording engineers were just beginning to work with stereo equipment which had just been installed in their studios, and they simply had not established any standard methods for mixing stereo sound. Panning instruments or singers' voices hard-left or hard-right was something you find in a great deal of all kinds of recordings from this transitional era, apparently because the mixing engineers did not know any better.

Probably the most famous example is the albums of the Beatles. The albums, starting circa 1963, were recorded on a small number of tracks that were mixed down to monaural and issued as monaural phonograph records. Stereo was brand-new as a commercial format, and around 1965, the Beatles' record label asked the Beatles' producer George Martin and his recording engineers to make additional re-mixes of the Beatles in stereo rather than mono (and the Abbey Road recording studios had to purchase and install all-new stereo equipment and learn how to use it). Then certain Beatles albums were released in a stereo phonograph version sold alongside the mono phonograph versions in some markets.

The stereo re-mixes of the Beatles are notoriously hard to listen to over headphones. All the guitars might be panned hard-right while all the vocals are panned hard left. Or Paul McCartney's lead vocal is panned hard right while all the backing vocals from the other band members are panned hard left, for example. History says that in those days the producer George Martin did not want to involve himself with mixing in stereo, so he supervised the original mono mixes himself but left the stereo remixes to his employees and did not give much thought or attention to the process.

The Beatles did not record a new album that they intended to be listened to in stereo until the Abbey Road album in 1969.

The primitive stereo re-mix versions of the earlier Beatles albums were the only ones available for purchase or played on the radio throughout the 1970s until 1982, when a very small limited edition of mono LP phonograph records was released. But generally speaking the public never heard the original mixes until 2009 when when a multi-CD box-set collection called The Beatles in Mono was made widely available.

Since I bought the Beatles in Mono boxed set, I'm like you: I can't stand to listen to the Beatles' primitive stereo mixes anymore, even though the stereo mixes were the only ones I heard my whole life, for about 40 years, until the mono set was released.

Historical background:

Subotnick's recordings first came out in 1967. The problem you have noted with instruments being panned hard-left or hard-right was very common on many recordings in those days.

In the mid-1960s, most record buyers had monaural (mono) "high-fidelity" or "hi-fi" sound systems and turntables and reel-to-reel tape machines that could only play back monaural recordings, not stereo. Most people had never heard stereo recordings.

There was a time in the mid-1960s when stereo record players and stereo amplifiers and speakers appeared on the market and sold in high numbers. At that time, record labels wanted to sell the new stereo phonographic disks, and the public was eager to buy them. The problem is that while recording studios would record the music on multi-track tape (often no more than 3 or 4 tracks total, or in rare cases in those days 8 tracks) the recording engineers only had experience in mixing down to monaural, and they would deliver the final album masters as a monaural recording. Recording engineers were just beginning to work with stereo equipment which had just been installed in their studios, and they simply had not established any standard methods for mixing stereo sound. Panning instruments or singers' voices hard-left or hard-right was something you find in a great deal of all kinds of recordings from this transitional era, apparently because the mixing engineers did not know any better.

Probably the most famous example is the albums of the Beatles. The albums, starting circa 1963, were recorded on a small number of tracks that were mixed down to monaural and issued as monaural phonograph records. Stereo was brand-new as a commercial format, and around 1965, the Beatles' record label asked the Beatles' producer George Martin and his recording engineers to make additional re-mixes of the Beatles in stereo rather than mono (and the Abbey Road recording studios had to purchase and install all-new stereo equipment and learn how to use it). Then certain Beatles albums were released in a stereo phonograph version sold alongside the mono phonograph versions in some markets.

The stereo re-mixes of the Beatles are notoriously hard to listen to over headphones. All the guitars might be panned hard-right while all the vocals are panned hard left. Or Paul McCartney's lead vocal is panned hard right while all the backing vocals from the other band members are panned hard left, for example. History says that in those days the producer George Martin did not want to involve himself with mixing in stereo, so he supervised the original mono mixes himself but left the stereo remixes to his employees and did not give much thought or attention to the process.

The primitive stereo re-mix versions of the Beatles albums were the only ones available for purchase or played on the radio throughout the 1970s until 1982, when a very small limited edition of mono LP phonograph records was released. But generally speaking the public never heard the original mixes until 2009 when when a multi-CD box-set collection called The Beatles in Mono was made widely available.

Historical background:

Subotnick's recordings first came out in 1967. The problem you have noted with instruments being panned hard-left or hard-right was very common on many recordings in those days.

In the mid-1960s, most record buyers had monaural (mono) "high-fidelity" or "hi-fi" sound systems and turntables and reel-to-reel tape machines that could only play back monaural recordings, not stereo. Most people had never heard stereo recordings.

There was a time in the mid-1960s when stereo record players and stereo amplifiers and speakers appeared on the market and sold in high numbers. At that time, record labels wanted to sell the new stereo phonographic disks, and the public was eager to buy them. The problem is that while recording studios would record the music on multi-track tape (often no more than 3 or 4 tracks total, or in rare cases in those days 8 tracks) the recording engineers only had experience in mixing down to monaural, and they would deliver the final album masters as a monaural recording. Recording engineers were just beginning to work with stereo equipment which had just been installed in their studios, and they simply had not established any standard methods for mixing stereo sound. Panning instruments or singers' voices hard-left or hard-right was something you find in a great deal of all kinds of recordings from this transitional era, apparently because the mixing engineers did not know any better.

Probably the most famous example is the albums of the Beatles. The albums, starting circa 1963, were recorded on a small number of tracks that were mixed down to monaural and issued as monaural phonograph records. Stereo was brand-new as a commercial format, and around 1965, the Beatles' record label asked the Beatles' producer George Martin and his recording engineers to make additional re-mixes of the Beatles in stereo rather than mono. Then certain Beatles albums were released in a stereo phonograph version sold alongside the mono phonograph versions.

The stereo re-mixes of the Beatles are notoriously hard to listen to over headphones. All the guitars might be panned hard-right while all the vocals are panned hard left. Or Paul McCartney's lead vocal is panned hard right while all the backing vocals from the other band members are panned hard left, for example. History says that in those days the producer George Martin did not want to involve himself with mixing in stereo, so he supervised the original mono mixes himself but left the stereo remixes to his employees and did not give much thought or attention to the process.

The Beatles did not record a new album that they intended to be listened to in stereo until the Abbey Road album in 1969.

The primitive stereo re-mix versions of the earlier Beatles albums were the only ones available for purchase or played on the radio throughout the 1970s until 1982, when a very small limited edition of mono LP phonograph records was released. But generally speaking the public never heard the original mixes until 2009 when a multi-CD box-set collection called The Beatles in Mono was made widely available.

Since I bought the Beatles in Mono boxed set, I'm like you: I can't stand to listen to the Beatles' primitive stereo mixes anymore, even though the stereo mixes were the only ones I heard my whole life, for about 40 years, until the mono set was released.

2 added 1922 characters in body
source | link

Historical background: What

Subotnick's recordings first came out in 1967. The problem you are referring tohave noted with instruments being panned hard-left or hard-right was avery common occurance in the early days of stereoon many recordings, in thethose days when.

In the mid-1960s, most record buyers had monaural (mono) "high-fidelity" or "hi-fi" sound systems and turntables and reel-to-reel tape machines that could only play back monaural recordings, not stereo. Most people had never heard stereo recordings.

There was a time in the mid-1960s when stereo record players and stereo amplifiers and speakers appeared on the market and sold in high numbers. At that time, record labels wanted to sell the new stereo phonographic disks, and the public was eager to buy them. The problem is that while recording studios would record the music on multi-track tape (often no more than 3 or 4 tracks total, or in rare cases in those days 8 tracks) the recording engineers only had experience in mixing down to monaural, and they would deliver the final album masters as a monaural recording. Recording engineers were just beginning to work with stereo equipment which had just been installed in their studios, and they simply had not established any standard methods for mixing stereo sound. Panning instruments or singers' voices hard-left or hard-right was something you find in a great deal of all kinds of recordings from this transitional era, apparently because the mixing engineers did not know any better.

Probably the most famous example is the albums of the Beatles. The albums, starting circa 1963, were recorded on a small number of tracks that were mixed down to monaural and issued as monaural phonograph records. Stereo was brand-new as a commercial format, and around 1965, the Beatles' record label asked the Beatles' producer George Martin and his recording engineers to make additional re-mixes of the Beatles in stereo rather than mono (and the Abbey Road recording studios had to purchase and install all-new stereo equipment and learn how to use it). Then certain Beatles albums were released in a stereo phonograph version sold alongside the mono phonograph versions in some markets.

The stereo re-mixes of the Beatles are notoriously hard to listen to over headphones. All the guitars might be panned hard-right while all the vocals are panned hard left. Or Paul McCartney's lead vocal is panned hard right while all the backing vocals from the other band members are panned hard left, for example. History says that in those days the producer George Martin did not want to involve himself with mixing in stereo, so he supervised the original mono mixes himself but left the stereo remixes to his employees and did not give much thought or attention to the process.

The primitive stereo re-mix versions of the Beatles albums were the only ones available for purchase or played on the radio throughout the 1970s until 1982, when a very small limited edition of mono LP phonograph records was released. But generally speaking the public never heard the original mixes until 2009 when when a multi-CD box-set collection called The Beatles in Mono was made widely available.

Historical background: What you are referring to was a common occurance in the early days of stereo recordings, in the days when most record buyers had monaural "high-fidelity" or "hi-fi" sound systems and turntables and reel-to-reel tape machines that could only play back monaural recordings.

There was a time in the mid-1960s when stereo record players and stereo amplifiers and speakers appeared on the market and sold in high numbers. At that time, record labels wanted to sell the new stereo phonographic disks, and the public was eager to buy them. The problem is that while recording studios would record the music on multi-track tape (often no more than 3 or 4 tracks total, or in rare cases in those days 8 tracks) the recording engineers only had experience in mixing down to monaural, and they would deliver the final album masters as a monaural recording. Recording engineers were just beginning to work with stereo equipment which had just been installed in their studios, and they simply had not established any standard methods for mixing stereo sound. Panning instruments or singers' voices hard-left or hard-right was something you find in a great deal of all kinds of recordings from this transitional era, apparently because the mixing engineers did not know any better.

Historical background:

Subotnick's recordings first came out in 1967. The problem you have noted with instruments being panned hard-left or hard-right was very common on many recordings in those days.

In the mid-1960s, most record buyers had monaural (mono) "high-fidelity" or "hi-fi" sound systems and turntables and reel-to-reel tape machines that could only play back monaural recordings, not stereo. Most people had never heard stereo recordings.

There was a time in the mid-1960s when stereo record players and stereo amplifiers and speakers appeared on the market and sold in high numbers. At that time, record labels wanted to sell the new stereo phonographic disks, and the public was eager to buy them. The problem is that while recording studios would record the music on multi-track tape (often no more than 3 or 4 tracks total, or in rare cases in those days 8 tracks) the recording engineers only had experience in mixing down to monaural, and they would deliver the final album masters as a monaural recording. Recording engineers were just beginning to work with stereo equipment which had just been installed in their studios, and they simply had not established any standard methods for mixing stereo sound. Panning instruments or singers' voices hard-left or hard-right was something you find in a great deal of all kinds of recordings from this transitional era, apparently because the mixing engineers did not know any better.

Probably the most famous example is the albums of the Beatles. The albums, starting circa 1963, were recorded on a small number of tracks that were mixed down to monaural and issued as monaural phonograph records. Stereo was brand-new as a commercial format, and around 1965, the Beatles' record label asked the Beatles' producer George Martin and his recording engineers to make additional re-mixes of the Beatles in stereo rather than mono (and the Abbey Road recording studios had to purchase and install all-new stereo equipment and learn how to use it). Then certain Beatles albums were released in a stereo phonograph version sold alongside the mono phonograph versions in some markets.

The stereo re-mixes of the Beatles are notoriously hard to listen to over headphones. All the guitars might be panned hard-right while all the vocals are panned hard left. Or Paul McCartney's lead vocal is panned hard right while all the backing vocals from the other band members are panned hard left, for example. History says that in those days the producer George Martin did not want to involve himself with mixing in stereo, so he supervised the original mono mixes himself but left the stereo remixes to his employees and did not give much thought or attention to the process.

The primitive stereo re-mix versions of the Beatles albums were the only ones available for purchase or played on the radio throughout the 1970s until 1982, when a very small limited edition of mono LP phonograph records was released. But generally speaking the public never heard the original mixes until 2009 when when a multi-CD box-set collection called The Beatles in Mono was made widely available.

1
source | link