7

We have for this side, this order for a song name:

Song Name (Original Producer vs. Remixing Producer)

For another side we this one with the remix label:

Original Producer - Song Name (Remixing Producer remix)

Which is the exact difference?

It has something to do with the level of remixing? (i.e. a remix barely modified to fit more like to the remixer style, against another remix which substantially modified the original song)

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5

vs, or v, meaning versus, is a way of giving two artists equal billing without implying that they wrote or performed the work together. It is therefore appropriate where one artist is a producer or remixer who has nevertheless had significant creative input into the final result, and would indeed suit cases where one artist's material has been modified to fit a remixer's style

A couple of examples:

Bob Marley vs. Lee "Scratch" Perry: The Best of the Upsetter Years 1970-1971 - in this case, Lee Perry is the producer, but the marketing decision has been made to highlight his input.

Massive Attack v Mad Professor - No Protection. This is a Remix album by Mad Professor of original Material by Massive Attack.

It is possible that the term originates partly from the reggae tradition of Sound Clash, in which events might be billed as featuring one system 'vs' another.

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"vs" means "versus", in the meaning "against" or "in opposition to". This is really a question about English language usage rather than music. What the particular site intends to express in that manner I have no idea. Presumably the remix may have a different name from the original, but labeling a single entry/category field in that manner does still not seem useful.

Possibly you are expected, when indeed those two differ, to enter both of them separated by VS. in the given order in a single field.

But that's entirely a stab in the dark.

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