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Can someone tell me why I like this track?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcZhJDUFb58

And why others like other tracks?

I wish someone give me an answer, not a random explanation.

are there any strict criteria that will guarantee that music is favorable to all people, something like math, 1+1=2

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    Music is very complex with a lot of possible axes of variation, people are also psychologically very complex, and the intersection of those two things is therefore extremely complex. For that reason, a general and full answer to your question hasn't been figured out yet. That's not to say there aren't some factors that can be isolated as predictors but the best anyone can do here is a partial answer. – user16 Feb 8 '16 at 15:16
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There is not currently any widely accepted or empirically successful theory of art. There have been many high-profile attempts to explain the value and/or appeal of art over the centuries, but none that have proven able to anticipate or even keep up with the evolution of art. In more recent years some sociological and statistical surveys have been able to identify some general wide trends, but not with much underlying philosophical backing. For example:

Netflix uses datamining on a massive scale to produce reasonably accurate predictions of what movies a given viewer will like, based on their viewing history.

The original study that gave birth to "The Mozart Effect" theory suggested modest gains in spatial reasoning based on exposure to classical music.

A more recent study suggests that creating a hit song is a combination of talent and luck.

The basic problem that no one has succeeding in solving is that we all have individual tastes --there is no one universal piece of art that all people in all times and places love (although some come close) --and yet it doesn't seem as though it can be completely random and unpredictable. Most of us agree that there can be actually better and worse pieces of art, but not necessarily what those are. (I've actually been personally working over the last 20 years on a theory of the kind you're seeking, but since it's original research, I won't include it here.)

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You ask specifically "for someone" so you're referring to the subjective quality of music. There are lots of factors involved here like:

  • The music you heard when you were a child (or according to some even when you were in the womb of your mother).
  • Your cultural background
  • Musical intelligence. This helps a lot in appreciating more complex kinds of music.
  • Your personality, even your genetic makeup
  • If you listen to certain styles of music a lot, the chances are you eventually will like it even if you didn't like it in the first place

Your last question has more (or less) to do with the objective qualities: there's not a specific equation but there are some general composition rules that can help make music likeable to more people but only within certain limits. It surely is possible to make "commercial" music, meant for a large audience, but a hit is never guaranteed and there's always people who will not like that music. Music that appeals to everyone doesn't exist.

  • is there an equation that guarntees my music to be favorable to a lot of people? why and why not? are there any logical or mathematical way to explain it? – Zazu Feb 8 '16 at 10:02
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    I've found that increasing my understanding of how particular sounds in music are created sometimes correlates with a decrease in my enjoyment of it (perhaps because I'm more familiar and more bored, or perhaps because I'm listening more analytically which can kill the fun). Thankfully it doesn't always happen! But I always feel a bit sorry for people who talk about appreciating music, and needing to be educated to do so... – user16 Feb 8 '16 at 11:10

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