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Several years ago I arranged a Purcell-like piece for chorus that someone remarked was "familiar," so I set it aside. It's one thing to borrow tropes from the baroque canon as an exercise and another to copy things, so I would like to know if someone can point to a classical (presumably baroque) piece that this one copies or strongly resembles, so I can give proper credit.

Either way it's a nice melody, and I have no vested interest. Thanks as always for the generous spirit of this site.

Edit, 12.19.16: This is an updated link that gives a much better idea. The first minute and twenty seconds contain the part of interest.

closed as off-topic by Phillip Siebold, Richard, Dom May 3 at 16:15

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    The link to the video is dead. – Brahadeesh Apr 5 at 6:39
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    @Brahadeesh: thanks will look at this when i get a moment. – daniel Apr 5 at 6:52
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The opening four-note riff is the same as Handel's Sonata in F Major, First Movement, but it diverges after that point fairly quickly.

I wouldn't worry overly much. When you're working in an older genre, it's almost inevitable that there will be some "familiar" elements.

  • Thanks for the link - actually those four were meant as instrument accompaniment to the [if it were in C] voice part, CGEDCG, so no worries. They will be less prominent than in the sample. You are right about the older genre, much has been done and even in that pre-internet world there was a lot of cross-pollination. Appreciate it. – daniel Oct 13 '16 at 15:53
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The opening of the alto voice starts to sound/look like Bach's Kunst der Fuge.

Although Bach's is minor and yours is major, there are certainly similar aspects between the two.

  • In terms of copying IMO there's less similarity here than in the above but thanks for pointing it out. – daniel Oct 16 '16 at 8:42

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