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11

"Big-legged" was the original celebratory code phrase for the female backside. Obviously, if you had big legs then they must culminate in an upper thigh/backside of similar proportions. The term "Big-Legged" was used in many songs, from Jerry Lee Lewis to Albert King. Eventually it just became the style to use the more obvious/crass description, which ...


11

The original, unedited and full version ends just after 10 minutes, however there is a "demo" version that plays up to eleven minutes and nine seconds, and there are various live albums that feature the song that smash through the thirteen minute barrier, such as One More From the Road and Lyve from Steel Town. The longest? Free Bird on the live album ...


9

There's a hip hop relationship with the blues, but perhaps a distant one and not too evident. There aren't many traces, if any, of the more traditional blues in hip hop. No 12 bar form and no blues harmonic structure (hip hop harmonic structure is usually fairly flat and static). But the more primitive forms of blues where also rather static harmonically, ...


8

14.58 is listed as the time for an alternate version on the expanded One More from the Road disc. The Southern By the Grace Of God version is 14.51.


6

Shortly after the emancipation of black Americans in the United States, leisure activities were being demanded by this overworked and disenfranchised sector of the country. Juke joints, speakeasies and creep joints (brothels) specifically catering to the black community began to spring up in the Southeast to meet the demand unfulfilled by whites-only bars ...


6

They're really just more to tell where a blues performer is from rather then describe the music as Chicago blues is blues from Chicago and Detroit blues is from Detroit. Just in general in music there will be slightly different sounds to the same genre as people in the same scene will play together and have just a slightly different take on similar ...


5

LOL. OK, this is just Keith Richards having no brain cells left, and a really thick British accent. What he's saying there is "He goes..." (meaning, "He plays it like this..."), but it comes out sounding like "eeee go...".


5

It's true that Led Zeppelin were notorious music thieves (with "Lemon Song" being a particularly infamous example). Like many other British musicians of the time, they had an unpleasant tendency to treat black American music as if it was a freely available natural resource, available to be plundered, and only under the domain of copyright after some white ...


4

Wheat's excellent answer covers the context, but read on for an (admittedly subjective) evaluation of the musical differences: R&B has encompassed many different styles over its lifetime, and continues to be a term in current usage today. In general, it has typically meant the style of vocals-oriented pop music most popular among "urban" (black) ...


4

According to discogs, "Don't Play Me Cheap" by Louis Armstrong was recorded on April 26, 1933, and released a little under a year later, on April 4, 1934. Discogs also lists the song as being of the Jazz genre and Swing style. This recording date and style pairing seem to align with the Swing music Wikipedia page, which states that Swing started in the early ...


4

Louis Jordan also recorded it in 1946 ( http://www.discogs.com/Louis-Jordan-And-His-Tympany-Five-Louis-Jordan-And-His-Tympany-Five/release/4552135 ), but to the best of my knowledge, the Count Basie recording is the original.


4

From Wikipedia: The album is a "best of" from the 42 concerts Eric Clapton did at the Royal Albert Hall in those two years. Clapton set a record by playing a run of 24 nights at the London Royal Albert Hall between 5 February and 9 March 1991, following an 18-night run in 1990. You can check out set lists for each date on this website, including ...


3

First I would like to define the terms Mods and Rockers, according to Wikipedia: Rockers The rocker subculture was centred on motorcycling, and their appearance reflected that. Rockers generally wore protective clothing such as black leather jackets and motorcycle boots (although they sometimes wore brothel creeper shoes). The common rocker hairstyle was ...


3

Those divine screams are definitely Johnny Winters'. Sleeve notes credit him Producer, Guitar, Voice [Miscellaneous Screaming] – Johnny Winter You can also see on this CD inner sleeve:


3

I agree with the comments by @Bebs and @Angst, this definitely sounds like it's from the guitarist rapidly playing a single note.


2

This is just an educated guess, but I think he's talking (derisively) about dancing. Classic blues is not a dance music, whereas R&B and Rock and Roll, both descended from the blues, are often used for dancing.


2

This song is swing music, a subdivision of jazz. Swing is also often referred to as "big-band music". Swing was at the height of its popularity in the 1930's and 40's. It was already declining in popularity by 1953. This music would have seemed slightly old-fashioned to the musicians that were pioneering newer styles in 1953 (bebop, rhythm and blues, ...


2

I believe that's what he's saying, yes. One lyrics site seems to think that it's "done", while another one seems to think it's "got". I'm not hearing "got" at all though. In addition, "you done me wrong" is such a common blues and rock'n'roll phrase when singing about a woman that I'd be inclined to conclude that the phrase he's singing is exactly what you ...


2

Electric blues is any blues music played with electric guitars, as opposed to the earlier blues styles on acoustic guitars. Chicago blues is a style of electric blues associated with the city of Chicago. Typically, electric blues are urban, associated with big cities like Chicago and Detroit, while acoustic blues are rural, and come from the deep South, ...


2

Your lyric is nearly correct, he's actually saying: Well, I'm all dressed up, ain't got no place to go "All dressed up and [no place / nowhere] to go" is a common American idiom meaning to be ready for something that hasn't materialized.


2

According to the Main Spring Press's Mamie Smith Discography, which sources Brian Rust's gigantic Jazz And Ragtime Records books, Coleman Hawkins likely played tenor saxophone on almost every Mamie Smith recording from May 1922 to January 1923; totaling eighteen recordings spread across nine recording sessions. They are: Circa early May, 1922 in New York "...


2

This is mainly intended as a supplement to @JoséDavid's excellent answer. Nearly every indigenous American musical form (other than Native American music) descends or was in some way influenced by the blues --it's the root of the family tree of American music. However, hip-hop is pretty far distanced from that ancestor --it's the child of rock / R&B, ...


1

"Amber Run - I Found" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yj6V_a1-EUA "Lo Fang - You're the one that I want" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jYluMAO1b7Y "See You Again / Love Me Like You Do / Sugar (Acoustic Mashup)" [Search in Youtube, unfortunately I can't link anymore with this low of reputation] "Lo Fang- Look Away" @2.18 min so peaceful. I hope at ...


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