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30

I would separate out the idea of "art music" -- or "high music" versus "low" music -- from the specific question of musical "classics." You can find clear taxonomies of genre from high to low in treatises going very far back in music history, clear back into the late Medieval period. Theorists understood that there was a music that "the people" made, and it ...


29

Symphonies were historically commissioned pieces of work. The commission was to pay for the writing and then the performing. Commissioning for symphonies has mostly disappeared so orchestras are not likely to take on new symphonies in their repertoire. Shostakovich composed under the commission of the Soviet State and they requested symphonies to be ...


22

All musical forms, from Gregorian chant to hip hop, are most closely associated with a particular time and place, they go in and out of popularity. Older forms become a niche product, created and appreciated by a select few, not the masses. The problem with symphonies is that they require a full orchestra, and thus are one of the most expensive musical ...


17

Many phonographs were able to play multiple records in sequence with a mechanism that would hold one or more records on the turntable, and one or more additional records elevated on the center post. At the end of one record, the mechanism sensed the tone arm reaching close to the center of the record, and then lifted it, pulled it out beyond the edge of the ...


15

There are still symphonic compositions being made but most are created as scores for movies. John Williams is one of the most prolific soundtrack composers, writing scores for Star Wars, Indiana Jones, Superman, and a great number of pieces that are embedded in the modern culture. I had the fortune of attending Star Wars in Concert and the experience was as ...


13

This is the second movement (the Allegretto) of Beethoven's Seventh Symphony (score). Your notation is slightly different from the Beethoven, but this is certainly the piece you're looking for. It's definitely a worldwide favorite, and for good reason!


12

YYZ by Rush is a pretty obvious example. YYZ is the IATA airport identification code of Toronto Pearson International Airport, near Rush's hometown. The band was introduced to the rhythm as Alex Lifeson flew them into the airport. A VHF omnidirectional range system at the airport broadcasts the YYZ identifier code in Morse code. Peart said in interviews ...


10

They've been using talking drums to communicate between African villages for centuries. (Drum telegraphy) A village elder, usually the griot, would play the drum to announce weddings, births, deaths, warnings of attack, etc. The griots of the neighboring villages would then repeat the tune to relay the message to their neighboring villages, so on and so ...


10

I think you have to distinguish between different aspects of a symphony when addressing the "demise" of the symphony in contemporary music. A symphony is among other things: a large-scale work (usually 30 ~ 60 minutes) a large-scale work (requiring 50 ~ 75 musicians) written for a more-or-less standard selection of instruments made up of 3 or 4 ...


10

Your piano playing sounds like a corruption of the 1st movement of Vivaldi's Spring from The Four Seasons. (Your piano playing is in the wrong key.)


9

In classical music, the term for composition inspired by or including a message or code is a cryptogram. This approach to composition was sometimes used by the western-European classical composers. See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_cryptogram Bach may have been the most prolific user of cryptograms. Among his entire compositional output (estimated up to ...


8

'Amarok' by Mike Oldfield is (mostly) instrumental (it contains some shouting and some spoken word. It also contains a bit of morse code : a sequence of Morse code found 48 minutes into the piece, spelling out "FUCK OFF RB" in reference to Virgin's Richard Branson, the man who had first signed him. Source: Wikipedia


8

Chopin was uninterested in any instrument other than the piano. As is known, other than pure piano pieces, he only wrote the cello pieces and songs in his very early youth and the two concertos. And the concertos he only wrote because some kind of portentous orchestral work was almost a requirement to be recognized as a serious composer, not that he was keen ...


7

It was just called music. It's hard to believe it, but this is the music everybody could hear and understand at the time (18th-19th century). Let's not forget that what we call today "classical music" evolved from folk music of the middle ages; let's say, Bach's suites, they contain Gigue, Gavotte, Allemande, Sarabande etc. These are no less than folk ...


7

In the begining of 19th century US law (copyright act of 1790) protected only American authors.(1) There were no international copyright agreements between the US and other countries, making it nearly impossible for a foreign author to protect his work in that country. One of the most victimized authors was Charles Dickens, whose novels were mercilessly ...


6

What was classical music called back in the days? (Pre 1900s?) Was it divided in to genres as we do today, or was it simply categorized by the type of instruments used, or just "concert music". We can look back at history in general, in so far as no man living during the Middle Ages would say he was living in "the Middle Ages" in a conversation. I am ...


6

This sounds to be based on Bach's Preludium in C Major, perhaps best known as the accompaniment to Charles Gounod's Ave Maria.


6

Certainly not classical, but your question led my mind directly to this track: Stubb (A Dub) by Mr Bungle off of their self-titled debut album. Mr. Bungle was an American experimental band from Eureka, California. The band was formed in 1985 while the members were still in high school, and was named after a 1950s children's educational film regarding bad ...


6

I am in a symphony and full orchestra. We only dress according to the music if it's a holiday and will wear costumes or hats for the fun of the audience. Our orchestras always stick to black tie because we don't stick out as much and we look more formal and professional. Some Orchestras prefer to switch it up. I believe that they're reasoning may be the ...


6

I would say it's "Morning Mood" from Edvard Grieg's Peer Gynt Suite No. 1. Peer Gynt started life as incidental music to the play of the same name by Henrik Ibsen; it included vocal as well as instrumental parts. Grieg later made two purely orchestral suites from it, "Morning Mood" (or, popularly, just "Morning") being the opening movement of the first ...


6

Musicians make music with the technology available. Do you think if Beethoven were alive today that he would scoff at the intricate variations in sound possible with modern equipment, and stick with piano music only? I don't think so. The same applies to the symphony composers you mention. Imagine creating beautiful music in a stream of pure ideal ...


6

This is the famous "Celebrated" Minuet, by classical composer Luigi Boccherini, frequently used in movies and on television as a signifier of elegance, class and refinement. For Suzuki-trained violinists, this piece is the graduation requirement for the second repertory book. The String Quintet in E major, Op. 11, No. 5 (G 275), by Luigi Boccherini was ...


6

The style of singing you describe is known as "intoning". Here is a description from online copy of ["A Dictionary of Music and Musicians (1900) edited by George Grove", article by William Smyth Rockstro] (https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/A_Dictionary_of_Music_and_Musicians/Intoning). INTONING. The practice of singing the opening phrase of a Psalm, ...


5

The rhythm and timing in Tool's Lateralus contain numerous references to the Fibonacci sequence and the Golden Ratio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lateralus_(song)


5

I think Mr. Bell is a little over the top. But the Chaconne is an impressive compositional achievement. Consider the challenge: you want to write a chaconne - that is, a dance piece built over a repeating bass line - but you are writing for a single instrument, not an ensemble with bass and treble instruments. That instrument normally plays just a single ...


5

The question is vague enough that I'm not sure I have the precise answer, but it seems to me that it may be referring to the work The Art of Noises (1913) by Luigi Russolo. The original is in Italian, but there's an English translation here. A couple of choice quotes getting at theme: In antiquity, life was nothing but silence. Noise was really not born ...


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