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7

This was going to be just a comment, but I'm going to put it in the answer space & take the downvotes like a grown-up ;) If you want the cynical answer, it's because there's so little actual excitement in the music itself that they have to do something to fill the stage. The material is identi-kit formulaic post-Stock, Aitken, Waterman that still seems ...


6

Citing a spin.com interview of Randy Jones and David Hodo (respectively the cowboy and construction worker of the song): Jones: We were flying up from South America for the show, and we worked on the choreography on the airplane — handclaps, turning, marching in place…stuff like that. Well, the audience at this particular taping was a bunch of kids ...


5

In the video, there are several dances represented. But generally this is swing dancing and they teach it at swing dance clubs. The first paired-dances you see in the video are variations of lindy hop (a member of the 8-counts) and in the latter you see east coast swing (a member of the 6-counts.) I personally prefer the Lindy Hop because the steps are ...


5

While your question is more about informal club dancing (what my wife thinks of as "free style"), I think that a quick look at formal dance styles will provide a firm basis for answering this question. In fact, my wife and I will often switch back and forth between informal club dancing and formal dancing, even within the same song - especially East Coast ...


4

This is a style from the '40s. Cab here is emulating a hepcat with how they typically walked. Hepcats were known for wearing Zoot Suits. Please read some of the book The Power of the Zoot: Youth Culture and Resistance During World War II by Luis Alvarez with keywords highlighted. Also, this style of how young men carried themselves can be seen in this ...


3

There is no known inventor of the moonwalk. The moonwalk is a shuffle-step performed backwards and repeatedly, to simulate one walking back. Shuffle-steps have always been one of the key pieces of African-American dance, and were notably used in the cakewalk, a dance that developed on southern platations in the 1800s following the end of slavery. Being ...


3

Music and dance have always been closely aligned, from folk traditions around the world, to the gavottes and minuets of the classical tradition, to the frenzied moshing of modern EDM concerts. It's nearly self-evident to note that music enhances dance, and dance enhances music --both are artistic reflections of the fundamental idea of rhythm. Dance nearly ...


3

How do people dance to drum and bass? Really fast! That's the most obvious answer, anyway. And I'm not joking. The other option is to dance half-time, i.e. on the snare (2 + 4). There is no pronounced 1 + 3 in DnB anyway. Most people do a combination of both: steps and larger body moves in half-time, smaller hand moves and quick steps in between. How do ...


3

There's definitely choreographed dancing that has been done to this music (witness http://youtube.com/watch?v=4fML73zVcTg and http://youtube.com/watch?v=h3R_lTxyhdE, which I found with a Google search for 'mingus "the black saint and the sinner lady" choreography'), so that's an existence proof that someone probably wrote out a choreography. Are you perhaps ...


3

Like you suggested in your question, I think it's The Twist, by Chubby Checker, followed by Let's Twist Again. Chubby Checker's version of The Twist was the most popular, but this song reached the charts multiple times with multiple artists: Hank Ballard and the Midnighters (1959), number 28 on the Billboard Hot 100. Chubby Checker (1960) , number 1 on the ...


3

"The Streets of Cairo" (1893), with the associated dance The Hootchie-Cootchie. Although the dance had made appearances in 1851 and 1873, the song had made the dance well known. And while the original was not copyrighted and never appeared on the charts, the melody and the dance has been used by several charting hits as a motif. Top five examples that ...


3

I can't say with certainty, but an early candidate is from Disney's "Silly Symphonies" cartoons from 1929. In the example below, we have a Iwerks, Clark & Jackson cartoon devoted to a dance of the skeletons. Music is by Carl Stalling and adapts Edvard Grieg's "March of the Dwarfs". Silly Symphony #1 - The Skeleton Dance (1929)


2

Since this word (or words) would best be used to describe the audience-performer interactions, I would suspect that there isn't going to be an obscure word for this. That is due to the fact that the interactions cannot be academicised as it is between trained musicians and untrained audience members. One of these words might be groove. Groove is commonly ...


2

Cheb Khaled ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Didi https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Didi_(song) https://youtu.be/gYvtBjJiDDc?t=27


2

It is Donald Trump who did a parody of Drake's Hotline Bling. He acts this dance in the show SNL during his campaign, in 2015. So, before the election.


2

Each kind of ballroom dance requires learning various standard figures or movements. A dance is simply a sequence of different figures. Transitioning from one figure to another can be easy or awkward depending upon which pair is involved, and knowing which figures are appropriate to choose next is a large part of choreography and dancing skill. The simplest ...


2

I think it's just meant to be part of the humor of the scene, without special meaning. The Cha-Cha step is two five-step sequences. You can see a demonstration in this YouTube video. For a viewer who knows this, then the movie scene could mean he's learning the dance but not quite there, or it could mean he knows some "super-secret-spy" seven-step ...


2

Most of what I've seen is "stepping", which I wrap my mind around by thinking of it is 'bass music skanking' (I know this isn't what the actual roots are, it's more rooted in jumpstyle and the crip walk, iirc). There's actually a whole subreddit devoted to it: https://www.reddit.com/r/dnbstep/ One of the fun things about dnb is the fact that the bpm is so ...


1

I'm surprised that no-one has thought to try dancing to this. Since Satie most likely did not intend the pieces for dancing, an attempt to do this would have probably appealed to his reportedly quirky and ironic humour.... Looking at this video, demonstrating the Saraband, I imagine that someone could dance a Saraband to the Satie pieces of that name. ...


1

This may sound strange, but the best way to find the count is often to follow the main melody, the lead vocals if there are any. To get to grips with this song my suggestion would be: listen to the song from the beginning and - in your mind - sing along using only the sentence "in a mellow tone 2 3 4 5 in a mellow tone 2 3 4 5" and keep repeating it ...


1

I have had similar experiences with trying to find the 1. I find it helps to remember that the heavy strokes on the snare are always on the 2 and the 4. The bass drum seems to act as only an accent on the upright bass so you are going to rely on the bass to tell what the 1 is. And part of the swing in swing is noticing that the bass has a slight bias ...


1

A few dance-oriented songs from the 80s or 90s with a similar title: "Open Your Mind" by U.S.U.R.A. (1993) "Open Your Mind" by Kleeer (1980) "Open Up Your Mind (Wide)" by The Gap Band (1979) I think it's still just "dance" music, maybe "club" music. I'm not sure why there isn't a tag for it at the moment, perhaps no one has asked a question about it yet?


1

This is a stretch of a guess, but could it be Michael Jackson's famous "Billy Jean" video? I know you said "a woman," but Michael is a bit androgynous, and this video is famous for the effect of Michael lighting up things by touching them (later parodied in Alien Ant Farm's cover of his "Smooth Criminal"). If it's not this video,...


1

Might be "Royksopp - 49 percent". Here is the video. Sadly poor quality, out of sync, and the only copy I was able to find. But in this case it seems to be a man, not a woman, that is dancing. Posting here in case you mis-remembered that part.


1

For drum and bass, the footwork is rather basic but open for much interpretation which is where the entire fun is. It is a two-step but for the tempo, you introduce a little fling. So the basic rhythm goes as following. For the right-hand: 1: Left foot down on the down beat 2: Left heel raise on the 2 3: Right foot down on the syncopated 3 ...


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