17

Oh, I see. Here's that story: During the time before music printing, and well into it, the vast majority of people didn't know about any music that wasn't being made right in their town or village. And there were very important composers (J.S. Bach is maybe the best example) who were completely obscure outside the city or small court in which they worked. ...


8

I like the way you think. It makes perfect sense on the surface. But the music industry and legalities surrounding it are complex. There are a few reasons why this practice has not become common in the music industry. First, many artists for one reason or another, do not wish to allow their music to be licensed or reproduced in a karaoke version. I ...


4

The song "All For You" was a surprise inclusion over the opening scenes of Transformers 4. It was scheduled to be released on CD as part of the soundtrack, but the entire soundtrack got scrapped over licensing rights. As of right now, the only way to obtain it is to rip the audio yourself from the DVD/Blu-Ray. It's not commercially available in any format....


3

Distribution companies can't get you on the radio. Traditionally, radio play is controlled by big labels with a lot of resources. Local, independent stations will often "break" new artists onto the airwaves, particularly local artists, but there are only a few of those left. Music distribution is how music gets delivered to the listener. ...


2

Actually, in jamaican reggae music, they do release the instrumental! Tradition, in jamaican reggae music, is mainly backing bands (e.g. Roots Radics, Sly & Robbie, The Skatalites, The Aggrovators...) recording riddims in studios. Lead singer artist then comes and records his song on that backing track. Riddim article on Wikipedia says : A given ...


2

The concept of a mix comes from the days of dub and disco when songs would be edited using mixing boards and tape to change the pace (especially in dub) or to change the length and ideal for mixing (especially in disco). The concept of a remix is to take the original tape and add or strip elements to the song to match the preference of the remixer. ...


1

In this day and age where people are not buying CD's distributions help to get your music to the digital platforms, Which is quit useless if you think about it, Because for the fact that your music is on platforms like iTunes, spotify and other popular outlets doesn't mean they gonna be bought. As an independent artists you are your own distribution if you ...


1

Although it has been more than 10 years I can tell you the ways my label screwed me. 1) Spending a lot of money- they spend money to promote me and my music, but in my opinion it did not always lead to sales, shooting a portion of a video in the middle-east when frankly a parking lot would have sufficed...Im not sure how this helped anyone but they seem to ...


1

I'm an intermediate level(aspiring pro) songwriter. I've just released an album of some of my work, which will soon appear online. On that album I decided to include an instrumental version of the last song. It was my decision, because I own all publishing. If I had an agreement/contract with a publishing company, I would need to consult with them, since I ...


1

Some singles are released with acapellas and/or instrumentals. But that is basically an open invitation for anyone to easily produce unauthorized derivative works. These, in turn, are unlikely to result in any direct additional income to the original artists/producers or label, and might even compete with them, so there is generally very little incentive ...


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