Hot answers tagged

11

Bob Dylan wrote a song called "Visions of Johanna" in 1965. Joan Baez was at the concert the first time he performed the song publicly and believed the lyrics referred to her. Presumably she is referring to herself in her song


7

Bluegrass is a sub-genre of Country Music with characteristics that differentiate it from mainstream Country: The instrumentation is purely 'string band' based: Guitar, Banjo, Mandolin, Fiddle and Upright Bass. There is more emphasis on an 'acoustic' sound. The music is more free and the structures are more complex. Elements of other styles like Jazz or ...


7

These are two different songs, although a lot of the elements (key, scale, harmonies, melodies) are quite similar in places. Led Zeppelin's song was originally titled "Driving to Kashmir", and had begun as a lyric Plant had been inspired to write in the autumn of 1973 after a drive through southern Morocco. The music evolved in the studio: ...


7

Surely the Banjo. Used in various forms in folk, bluegrass, trad jazz/dixieland. Even in some pop tunes (in the US and around the world). And it even found a place in traditional Irish folk music. The resonator guitar should fit the bill as well.


6

That's the old English carol "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen," one of my own personal favorites. This is a bluegrass version. It more commonly sounds faintly medieval, probably because of being written in the Aeolian mode (natural minor), where the seventh is a whole-step below the octave, rather than the more modern half-step. The same mode is often found ...


6

I think the interpretation of these lyrics is still somewhat open and that's partly why people like this song so much. I think they can be taken in the context of the time period, the 60s. Using this time in the US there were two major issues that people protested about, civil liberties and war. So the first line questions when is a man not a man. In terms ...


6

There's the lap steel guitar, developed in about 1935 in Los Angeles by a steel guitar player named George Beauchamp from the Hawaiian steel guitar. This evolved into the modern Pedal Steel Guitar. There is also the bass guitar which evolved from the electric guitar but is now generally considered to be a different instrument. The first basses were ...


5

It's sung by fictive observers, the story teller so you will. Silibrand is just the father's name and he finds his daughter going into the woods to give birth. So he helps her laying his cloak on the ground that she may lay more comfortable. Sadly both boys die and they give their souls to the Gods. Afterwards the mother is going to die too while the father ...


5

The "Londonderry Air" is very old melody from the County of Londonderry in Ireland. It was first published in 1855 by the Society for the Preservation and Publication of the Melodies of Ireland in their book "The Ancient Music of Ireland". Since the composer (whoever it was) must have died over 70 years ago, the tune is in the public domain in most countries ...


3

Singer-songwriter Melanie Safka was a 70s folksinger with a quirky, offbeat sensibility. She was most famous for her gospel-influenced Woodstock tribute "Lay Down (Candles in the Rain)" and her eccentric, childish hit "Brand New Key." "What Have They Done to My Song, Ma" is a satirical number more in the vein of the latter than the former. Like Pink ...


3

To me it sounds like Silibrand's daughter fled her marriage. Women would have ordinarily given birth at their husbands' homes, but she returned to her father's home at her peril. Also, her gold rings had not been used since wedding, which, to my mind, signals unhappiness. I like the interpretation that she was dying and giving out her possessions: the gray ...


3

"Dirty folk" does not seem to be a term in wide or common use. The "dirty blues", however, is an old and well-established subgenre of the blues. It is called "dirty" because it has "dirty" words and/or sexual themes. Based on the link you provided, "dirty folk" is likely the same thing for folk music --folk music with bad language and/or sexual themes. ...


3

The history of the various peoples known as "Celts" is long and scholars are not in total agreement about all of it. Today the nations known as 'Celtic' have a living Celtic language spoken in some of that nation's territory (Wales, Scotland, Ireland , Brittany, Cornwall, Isle of Man) or a recent Celtic heritage but no surviving language (Galicia and other ...


3

北原白秋(Kitahara Hakushu) received an invitation to a concert of children's song from an elementary school in Niigata prefecture in June 1922. He receiveed a big welcome there from the children and he was ordered to make a song of Niigata from them. He wrote words and asked 中山晋平(Nakayama Shinpei) to compose music for it. It is a song of "Sunayama" and published ...


3

The bass guitar was developed by Leo Fender in America. Riffing off of that, Ernie Ball(working in California) based the acoustic bass guitar off of the Mexican guitarron. The Appalachian dulcimer, played like a lap guitar, was invented in the eastern US, hence the Appalachian moniker.


3

Guitar-type instruments The archtop mandolin is an entirely American innovation. The bowl-back and flat-back versions were European, but the archtop was invented in the US by Orville Gibson. Similarly, the archtop guitar was also invented by Gibson. Parlor guitars were invented in the US as a more "family-friendly" version of the larger-bodied ...


3

The Santiago song and the Sweeney piece are based on the same original melody, but that's not "Tha Mi Sgith" which is very different. The Sweeney piece is titled "Star of the County Down" which would indicates an Irish origin rather than a Scottish one. The Wikipedia page for "Star of the County Down" lists "Mädchen von Haithabu" as a recorded version.


2

According to the Japanese Wikipedia article, it was composed in 1922 by Shinpei Nakayama. I hope this helps at least a little.


2

I got a fast answer by posting to the Russian Language Stack Exchange as suggested by Angst. The Romanized name of the song is "Shalandy polnye kefali" ("Scows Full of Mullet") by Mark Bernes. The original is available on YouTube here. The translated lyrics are available here.


2

"Sponge cake" could well be an allusion to small, significant commodities that which can be mass produced and discarded like a Lamingtons. The words "sponge cake", here could have a similar meaning to the British usage of "trifles" when referring to trivial items. There's no record of the recipe of Lamingtons being sold; this website purports to contain a ...


2

Chris' answer notwithstanding, there's an additional 'oddness' to that song... You can think of the song as having two 'choruses' - one in the verse & another in the chorus itself. I think I'd be inclined to call it a Refrain rather than a chorus, if viewed this way - it also echoes Chris' sentiment of it being a call & response song. Oh the ...


2

"Greeting" is Scots for crying, so the woeful will cease their crying... Example link explaining


2

I can suggest : Cloud Control, an indie rock band from the Blue Mountains (Australia). Georgia Fair, a folk rock band from Sydney. Boy & Bear, folk rock band from Sydney. Check this playlist for more ideas. On lo-fi style The Hawk Moth Records label has published a compilation with various Australian folk artists. As they say in the description: ...


2

I've never heard of either of the 2 acts but I will take your word for the relative success of them, but I do have an explanation. About 20 years ago, I saw Alexander O'Neal play as the opening act for British singer Lorraine Cato here in the UK. Now, I don't know if you know much about this type of music, but at that point, Alexander O'Neal had already had ...


2

In the US, such songs might be entered into a "Old American Songbook" (songs predating 1919 are generally considered too old for the Great American Songbook where libraries limit themselves to 1919 to 1955. Songs after that date are sometimes sorted into a "New American Songbook") Otherwise, many commercial songs that have made it into ...


2

a plaintive remenisence about Joan's love for Bob Dylan about what they experienced together in the 60's. Obviously a human with great heart and soul. She depicts the poignant feelings that come flooding back when she reads about the "prince" returning to performing. This is a pretty accurate depiction of how deep feelings may seem buried but are ...


2

As far as I know, that specific phrase does indeed originate with "Summertime." It's a peculiarity of lullabies that they are intended to comfort infants, and yet many of them deal with dark and morbid themes. In this case, the phrase "rise up singing" is a description of death as a joyful release from life, so the song is really an Ecclesiastes-like ...


2

Actually, the description for this video says: Music: Russian Folk Music - Russian Winter Searching this on YouTube lead to another video of this song, uploaded by Brandon Fiechter. Here, the description links to this song on a sheet music portal, where the description says: Russian Winter by Brandon Fiechter. Russian folk music about a cold winter in ...


2

My interpretation of this is as follows: It seems to be sung by a person who has died and is lamenting the fact that they can no longer communicate with a loved one. If you could here me speak , where would I begin Infering that you can't hear dead people. Also, if you look at the words in further verses: Out in the field where the lark it sings ...


2

I was trying to research the same question. I thought perhaps the singer (as a man) was a dead soldier, or someone who committed suicide for a lost love. His heart lies in a field where no one goes. Only the lark flies to that area. He is cold (dead) but time has past, his spirit can run free; but his love cannot hear him speak. Even if she could, he ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible