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7

Surely the Banjo. Used in various forms in folk, bluegrass, trad jazz/dixieland. Even in some pop tunes (in the US and around the world). And it even found a place in traditional Irish folk music. The resonator guitar should fit the bill as well.


6

There's the lap steel guitar, developed in about 1935 in Los Angeles by a steel guitar player named George Beauchamp from the Hawaiian steel guitar. This evolved into the modern Pedal Steel Guitar. There is also the bass guitar which evolved from the electric guitar but is now generally considered to be a different instrument. The first basses were ...


6

It's Billy Idol - White Wedding (1982) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AAZQaYKZMTI Wikipedia: White Wedding (song)


5

Is it possible that you are thinking of the game soundtrack of Bachsmith II http://www.deezer.com/us/album/11803966? Actually the Rondo Alla Turca is from the first part: http://www.deezer.com/us/album/8440555 Seems that the performers are The Notetrackers. Here is the cover of the game that I think matches your description:


4

I'll try to explain, however I'm no guitar maker or acoustic engineer so it might be quite technically inaccurate... Let's begin: As you can see, there are 3 single-coil pickups on a Stratocaster. In this case, each pickup possesses 6 permanent magnetic pole-pieces that are located under each strings. diagram of a single-coil pickup When a string is ...


4

A quick Google for "blonde female guitarist" revealed her to be called "Orianthi Panagaris". She is a very big deal indeed, having been hand-picked by Michael Jackson for the ill-fated "This Is It" concerts, and therefore likely appears in the rehearsal film that was commercially released.


4

I think that the original response is a little unfair given the self-proclaimed inexperience of the questioner. It all largely comes down to a matter of taste. Music buyers (you and me) on the whole don't buy CDs because someone's won some Grammys and so forth. We buy it for the feel, the groove, the thrill, the excitement. Clapton is revered because of ...


4

It's a study from Ferdinando Carulli, from opus 241 (Ecole de Guitare). Don't know exactly where it appears in the original, but you might find it here, if you're willing to do some searching. And, fwiw, I find it a lovely piece. Delicate, simple, easy, without any frills. Just plain pretty, beautiful. I'm not a big Carulli fan, but he had his moments.


4

This melody appears (in 12/8 time) as the sixth movement of Vivaldi's Gloria (RV 589), an aria for soprano on the text Domine Deus, rex coelestis.


3

Here are dictionary definitions I found for the adjective "eclectic": "deriving ideas, style, or taste from a broad and diverse range of sources" (the first definition found in today's Google search for the word "eclectic") "composed of elements drawn from various sources" "selecting what appears to be best in various doctrines, methods, or styles" (...


3

"Stairway to Heaven" is a song by the English rock band Led Zeppelin, released in late 1971. It was composed by guitarist Jimmy Page and vocalist Robert Plant for the band's untitled fourth studio album (often called Led Zeppelin IV).


3

Mayer is known as a great guitarist, but not a particularly innovative one. The guitarists you cited were of an earlier generation, and helped pioneer the characteristic sound of the electric guitar. In general, all the most celebrated guitarists have their own distinctive, instantly recognizable sound, which they either created or popularized. It is, ...


3

There are many ways it would have affected his sound. A few points about the interaction of pickups and strings changes. The angle of the bridge pickup is backwards. This will cause his higher strings to be further away from the bridge where they pass over the pickup and his lower strings closer to the bridge where they pass over it. This will have caused ...


3

I explored on this topic a bit, It turns out that guitars were used in Rock 'n' Roll before mid 1950s, prior to them being used as lead instruments. The earliest I could find was late 1920s from this article, which says, "Crazy About My Baby" by Blind Roosevelt Graves and brother Uaroy, recorded in 1929, was a rhythmic country blues with small group ...


3

Jimi was inspirational for many guitarists because he combined technical proficiency, experimentation, and showmanship. This mixture would start the whole "guitar hero" phenomenon in the late 1960s, with other guitarists following his lead. The fact that he died so early allowed other guitarists to fill the void and build a legend around Jimi. A ...


3

The bass guitar was developed by Leo Fender in America. Riffing off of that, Ernie Ball(working in California) based the acoustic bass guitar off of the Mexican guitarron. The Appalachian dulcimer, played like a lap guitar, was invented in the eastern US, hence the Appalachian moniker.


3

Guitar-type instruments The archtop mandolin is an entirely American innovation. The bowl-back and flat-back versions were European, but the archtop was invented in the US by Orville Gibson. Similarly, the archtop guitar was also invented by Gibson. Parlor guitars were invented in the US as a more "family-friendly" version of the larger-bodied guitars ...


2

These are modern 'garage rock' influenced bands. Garage rock has influence from rhythm & blues, punk rock, and traditional rock-n-roll. The mainstream success of 00's bands like the white stripes, the hives, the vines, the strokes, and the black keys popularized the genre. Modern Pop-rock/Modern rock would be what I consider your examples. It owes a ...


2

He's continued to write songs to this day in his solo career. He hasn't had as much main stream success, but he does continue to write and he has many solo albums currently out: Golden Heart (1996) Sailing to Philadelphia (2000) The Ragpicker's Dream (2002) Shangri-La (2004) One Take Radio Sessions (2005) Kill to Get Crimson (2007) Get Lucky (2009) ...


2

A quick whip up. It's in standard tuning (E2 A2 D3 G3 B3 E4). I don't claim it to be exactly as played but maybe it's good enough to get you started. The chords are just simple notes and to have something to aim at, and without the flageoletts/harmonics. Cheers,


2

Doing a quick Google search on your label information ("Hemosch Musikinstrumente") identifies this as an archtop guitar sold under his own label by instrument dealer Heinrich Moritz Schuster (HeMoSch), but likely manufactured at the Todt workshop: https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://www.guitardoc-vintage.de/vintage-lounge-...


2

John Mayer now plays with Dead and company. And guitar excellence is part of their tradition. Especially improvisation. I'm a Deadhead but not a big JM booster, but I recognize his skill. He does a pretty good job of exploring the improvisational space the Dead allow him. So, it is my humble opinion that he IS considered on par as witnessed by his ...


2

A fairly typical setup for a rock band is lead guitar, rhythm guitar, drums and bass. As you indicated, the lead guitarist plays the solo lines, as opposed to the rhythm guitarist who plays chords. It's often the lead vocalist on rhythm guitar, since it's easier to sing while playing chords than while doing lead lines. However, all of this is completely ...


2

Most people keep throwing around the misconception that the Ukulele was engineered in all its (small) glory in the US. The Ukulele spawned from the adaptation of the Portuguese instrument "Machete" (brought to the island by portuguese immigrants), which, in itself, is an adaptation/transformation of the Original, the "cavaquinho". If you look at it, it's ...


1

This is the best place to find if a musician has played a song live. It doesn't look like anyone recorded him playing it live. My guess - this song was recorded for the Super Mario Brothers movie, released in 1993. Also released in 1993: The Extremist. My guess would be that he recorded Speed of Light in late 1992 - maybe even as an extra track that never ...


1

For Roger Miller's Roger Miller album, that features the opening song River in the Rain, Discog credits: Electric Guitar – Larry Byrom, Reggie Young I would bet on Reggie Young since he's more reputed as a studio lead guitarist and has played with Merle Haggard for several albums, so your intuition was right.


1

It's not necessarily a genre per se, but there are plenty of hits for "ambient piano," although a lot of them are more uptempo that what you are looking for. I modified it as "sad ambient piano" and "slow ambient piano" and got some songs that sounded pretty close. You might also enjoy the Jon Brion instrumentals on the Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless ...


1

This is a fairly standard electric guitar riff, and unlikely to be a sample or a cover. Your best bet on finding similar music is to look for electric blues or blues rock. It sounds like this riff is using a slide, so you might add that into your search. Compare, for example, this recent electric blues piece by Gary Clark Jr. (there's a long section near ...


1

For the quintessential french balladeur accompanying himself (mostly) with a classical guitar, I suggest Georges Brassen. He has a deep baritone voice, but not rough as the russian example provided by the OP. His lyrics are extremely poetical, with a vein more lyrical than political, but some social concerns with an anarchist influence are also present. ...


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