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This question immediately brings to mind The Ketchup Song (Aserejé) by Las Ketchup. Its chorus is a rendering, in Spanish-language nonsense syllables, of the English-language chorus of Rapper's Delight by the Sugarhill Gang.


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I believe that R&B is rapping with melody to it, whereas rapping in hip hop doesn't include melody and harmony


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"De do do do de da da da" is a satirical song by the British rock band The Police. The song you are thinking of is the similarly named "Di Doo Dah" (written by Serge Gainsbourg) which was indeed released by Jane Birkin (but in 1973, not 1969) on the album of the same name. The songs are not particularly similar musically, but both revolve ...


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I'd have to add Michael Jackson to this list. From the 60's to the early 2000's, he had chart toppers that were actually relevant. His ability to change his music and performance style to fit a particular decade was unique. While there are musicians that attain this status, there are few who were known around the world. It is also Michael Jackson's "...


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The song was written before Wham even had a name, way back in '81. George took over the writing by the time the band were recording, so everything after that tends to only have his name attached to it. The one thing you have to bear in mind above all else is that George's ego was the biggest thing in Wham. Bigger than Andrew, bigger than the name, bigger ...


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C-sharp minor is not a particularly rare key. If we take the Wikipedia page Compositions by Key, count the compositions linked and turn this into a table we get the following: (Note: this data is probably wildly inaccurate. If you can provide a link to better statistical data, please do so in a comment.) sharps/ key # key # key # ...


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A quick check found Beethoven's String Quartet, (op. 131) as well as a Sinfonia by Joseph Martin Kraus (VB 140), both without piano. Sharps are less problematic for amateur string players than flats and four accidentals in a key signature are far from uncommon, so these are unlikely reasons for the key you observe as underrepresented.


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The bar before rehearsal number nine is in 3/2 and the problem is Stravinsky can't decide whether to conduct half notes ("in three") or quarter notes ("in six"). "One bar for nothing in four" means he's going to give them four silent beats before they start (i.e. a count-in). He announces that he's going to conduct the bar in three ("the bar before nine is ...


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There are a couple of compilations called The Roots of Chicha: Psychedelic Cumbias from Peru that I really enjoyed. Haven’t really had time to fall down the rabbit hole looking for more of this, but definitely will be doing soon.


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