6

That's a vibraphone. It's like a xylophone, but the bars are metal, so they vibrate longer. The resonators below the bars have discs inside that are turned by a motor, alternately opening and closing the resonator, causing the volume to oscillate, simulating vibrato and giving the instrument its name. The motor can be turned off, in which case the vibrato ...


5

At the bottom of that sheet the publisher information is given: "U.E. 161". U.E. is short for Universal Edition. At their webpage, they have a catalogue. Searching for number 161 leads to the following entry: "Lemoine H.: Études enfantines op. 37 [1] UE 161" So, the piece is from an etude op. 37 by Henry Lemoine. It is played at ...


4

In its spirit, this music reminds me of Pierre Henry's music, the most famous piece being "Messe Pour Le Temps Présent": If this is indeed what you are looking for, this is categorized in the Musique Concrète genre, even though Music Concrète is often not that fast and rhythmic (listen to this for example). Quoting ...


3

It's "Just Cancel My Dream" recorded by Larry Green and his Orchestra in 1946, on the B-side of "Little Girl", and featuring Don Grady on lead vocals (RCA Victor cat# 20-2813). Note: the video starts with the vocal chorus which starts at about 1:30 in the original. The Internet Archive has the original recording, also downloadable as MP3.


3

The first thing to point out is that this is a ballad and there are no improvised solos on this song, just the melody once through, then back to the bridge to the end. So the only improvisation comes in the form of embellishing and filling around the melody. A ballad is not a “style” simply a type of song. Another thing to point out is that Oscar Peterson ...


2

There are likely a lot of influences here, but I'd suggest this is most inspired by Bulgarian folk music. Though you mention the first minute, it's actually at around 1:02 that tipped me off — their women's singers use extremely close harmonies that create small moments of dissonance. This kind of music comes from a long tradition of music meant to be ...


2

I've taken a look at Tigerland's end credits and this piece of music doesn't seem to be listed (hence its absence on IMDB as well). It may indeed be a traditional song but I cannot tell you the name. I believe the instrument we hear is one of the Huqin family, one of the most famous in the western culture being the erhu. They are traditional Chinese two-...


2

Given that the film this comes from is set in an American training camp for the Vietnamese war, I'm guessing the theme is most likely inspired by traditional Vietnamese music, with some American additions. The instrument sounds like a monochord, an instrument with a single string, leading to smooth pitch changes (somewhat similar to a slide guitar or a ...


2

This is the "Pops Orchestra" or "pops" style, a pop-influenced style performed by a full symphonic orchestra. The repertoire is usually a mixture of famous classical music performed in a jazzy, pop style, or older popular music scored for orchestra. There's some original music specific to the genre, but that's comparatively rare. There's ...


2

The Apple music entry for the song categorises it as "J-pop". This is hard to categorise... Melodic pop, but with a club/dance beat also. The Japanese vocal seems to emphasise the melody more than the dance beat, compared with the English version. There are dance music genres, for example Deep House, which combine a melodic vocal with a dance beat,...


1

The LDS genre is exactly as it seems: music and artists consist with or of interest to Mormons. A couple of examples: There is an organization called "Latter-day Saint Musicians" that has a Spotify account ... to provide a library of good music that people can listen to and discover without being concerned about songs that have questionable lyrics....


1

This seems to be inspired by "Early Music" which the name given to Medieval European folk music. Compare this similar sounding example of "Early Music": The instruments in the sample are all synthesized by the game's music engine, but they sound like they are imitating early music instruments such as a ...


1

Flamenco Jazz exists and your piece seems to fit. One of the best known proponents of this style is guitarist Paco de Lucia. If you want to hear a good example you should listen to his 1980 live recording "Friday Night in San Francisco" together with John McLaughlin and Al Di Meola. Here's a later live performance:


1

As the title of this video is, it is a compilation of ballad CPOP. As far as I know there is not a specific genre for such works besides 'CPOP' and 'ballad', however, I recognized there are some house elements in these songs and supposed that was the reason why it gave a background music vibe to you. I recommend to check progressive house or deep house music ...


1

In addition to the change in structure, the solo you're referring to was written and performed by Josh Homme of Queens of the Stone Age, which would definitely mark it off as distinct-sounding from the rest of the track. This fact is well known by fans but I couldn't find a super reliable looking source. https://www.songfacts.com/facts/biffy-clyro/bubbles


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