5

Just a guess, but how about "Unchained Melody" by the Righteous Brothers? It's actually from 1965, but it's considered an iconic love song, and has appeared in countless movies.


4

The YouTube video gives you a clue: "Newt's Friend" by James Newton Howard. The real name of the piece is "A Good Friend" and it's on the soundtrack of the movie "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them". The soundtrack version is sung by a wordless choir, so there are no lyrics. You can buy the soundtrack from Amazon, listen to the original on YouTube ...


3

This is the second movement of Beethoven's Symphony no.7 in A major.


3

Possibly True by Spandau Ballet. Song has been used in many films and TV shows since its release in 1983 Includes soft male voice in chorus The structure that was described seems to match the cadence of the melody in the song's chorus (although, it's Hu's instead of Du's :-))


2

This is "Ballade pour Adeline" composed in 1976 by Paul de Senneville and Olivier Toussaint. It was Richard Clayderman's greated hit.


2

Assuming you are asking about the son "Voyage, Voyage" by Desireless. The song was sung by Claudie Fritsch-Mentrop under her stage name "Desireless" and composed and produced by Jean-Michel Rivat and Dominique Dubois. She didn't even start working with the composers/producers of the song until 1984. From her web site: En 1984, j'entame ma ...


2

The video I finally found is: Love Like This (live) by The Belonging Co. featuring Hope Darst I've never known love like this, so beautiful I'll never get used to this, my heart is Yours Of this I am convinced, from now until the end I'll never know love like this, so beautiful ... You don't leave me where You found me You pull me up out ...


1

It is the final cadence section of the finale of Verdi's opera Rigoletto. The cadence is C#m/G# - G#7(b9) - C#m (i6/4 - V9 - i).


1

The extract is from the third movement of Frédéric Chopin's Piano Sonata No.2 B-flat minor, Op.35. The sonata was published in 1840, but Chopin had composed this movement at least two years earlier. This movement is also known as his funeral march, in fact it was played at his own funeral (against his wishes). The first part of the movement is better known....


1

Ended up finding it by myself: it's the theme song of "Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence", composed by Ryuichi Sakamoto. The part that I recorded starts at 0:55.


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