11

Most of the Young Americans sessions, which began on August 11, 1974, were at Sigma Sounds Studios in Philadelphia, where the producer/songwriter team of Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff recorded the likes of The O'Jays, Harold Melvin & The Blue Notes, and Billy Paul, among others, on their Philadelphia International Records label. In addition, famed Philly ...


5

Yes, this song is a 100th birthday tribute to Frank Sinatra, as confirmed by the band's Instagram post: Frank Sinatra turns 100 this year. I attach his music to so many memories: Opening presents on Christmas day, my grandparents teaching the rest of the family to swing dance, watching “Who Framed Roger Rabbit” with my siblings (Sinatra makes a cameo in ...


4

Hard to answer, but let's see what we got. According to http://disney.wikia.com/wiki/Inspector_Gadget_(song) the IG theme was written by Haim Saban and Shuki Levy for the original cartoon series that aired from 1983 to 1986. This would give it a date of 1983 "South of Heaven" dates from 1987 or so. So the timeline supports the one borrowing from the other. ...


3

Many also draw connections between "This is Spinal Tap" and "The Bad News Tour" from The Comic Strip Presents (1983). But as stated previously, it likely drew influence from a number of musicians and comedians.


3

'Tap are just based on astute observations of rock bands and the lifestyle in general, not any one band in particular. There are plenty of references through out the film, e.g. death by vomit ala Jimi hendrix, Bon Scott, John Bonham; the band getting lost in the stadium at Cleveland is a reference to a real life documentary which includes a scene of Bob ...


3

There is no actual answer to this question. Spinal Tap, believe it or not, began in the mind of Rob Reiner (Meathead, if you're an All In The Family fan...) in 1979. There was a reference to the band in a skit he wrote for a show called "The T.V. Show" which aired on ABC. It is said that some aspects relate to certain real-life events (i.e. the drummer ...


3

Jerry Garcia started off as a banjo player, and one part of the roots of the Dead were in a jug band called Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions. So I would guess that Garcia knew his bluegrass pretty well even before the rock thing came along.


1

You're right, the peppy rhythmic line is very reminiscent of "All of My Love", although the instrumentation is different from that song. As far as the instruments, it sounds like a very characteristic drum sound and guitar sound for Led Zeppelin as well. Compare this classic Led Zeppelin track Black Dog. The song itself isn't that similar, but the way ...


1

There are certain stylistic choices that can start out as personal idiosyncrasies, but become so widely imitated that they end up as genre markers. For modern pop/R&B, one of the most characteristic of these markers is "melisma," the singing of multiple pitches on a single syllable. Originating in the black gospel, church-influenced sound of soul ...


1

On this interview of the drummer Shane Cody by The Waster: “We all went on a big Neil Young kick a few years ago. They are said to be influenced by The Band, as speculated by some media here, here and here, even Houndsmouth denied it : From The Waster: "The Band (...) we had never really listened to them, everybody knew, The Weight, and Up On Cripple ...


1

It was through hanging out with David Crosby and CS&N. Workingman's Dead isn't bluegrass, it's 'wooden music' based on songs with three and four part harmonies.


1

Very very unlikely - Good for You - from the album Toto IV, 1982 I Could Be So Good for You - Minder theme, ITV series 1979. It's not an uncommon sound, though. It's what I'd call 'Pub Rock with a hint of Chas & Dave' - well, the Minder theme, not Toto ;) The music was written by Gerard Kenny, an American jobbing songwriter in the UK with sufficient ...


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