Hot answers tagged

19

From experience, here is what I think of a jazz standard: A jazz standard is usually a famous jazz song. The reason it is called standard, is because it has been recorded many many times, by numerous different artists (and usually in many different kinds of jazz). So, if you want to learn how to play jazz, you can find a jazz standard (they go from really ...


10

IDK, if this answers your question. But here is what I think: Jazz standard Jazz standards are musical compositions which are an important part of the musical repertoire of jazz musicians, in that they are widely known, performed, and recorded by jazz musicians, and widely known by listeners. There is no definitive list of jazz standards, and the ...


9

Some genres and styles (not exclusive to jazz) are based on very well stablished and known patterns and dynamics: specific cadences, progressions, scales, rhythms, instruments, etc. Free jazz is a very loose concept that tries to label improvised performances that try to cut away those common conventions. As you walk into the realm of the uncommon, things ...


8

The blue note refers to a particular type of note: In jazz and blues, a blue note (also "worried" note1) is a note that—for expressive purposes—is sung or played at a slightly different pitch than standard. W.C. Handy, the "Father of the Blues" (an innovator who transformed the blues from an isolated folk tradition into an enduring popular-music ...


8

It seems that the phrase has multiple possible sources with none truly confirmed. I've listed the sources below: "..poet Samuel Coleridge (1825): 'All nature seems at work ... The bees are stirring—birds are on the wing ... and I the while, the sole unbusy thing, not honey make, nor pair, nor build, nor sing.'" "earlier instances of this idiomatic ...


6

I would like to answer from a humble listener point of view, with absolutely no music theory background. For me free jazz is like an open window into musician's mind. It's his stream of consciousness rendered in real time into music. If you can tune to this transmission (and the only thing I believe is required to do this is to be completely calm and relaxed)...


6

Samba was indeed the popular music in Brazil prior to Bossa Nova, and before that came Choro. However, it's worth noting two things: Firstly, samba in Brazil existed in multiple forms, including not just the carnivalesque (and internationally successful) samba-exaltação, but also the slower, tragic-romantic (but equally overblown) samba-canção. Second, ...


6

That's a pork pie hat. Standard issue headwear in 50s jazz. As per Mingus' "Goodbye Pork Pie Hat"


6

I think if you look beyond taste/personal preference it's easy to see that Coleman was an extremely skilled musician. I think it's easy in this day and age to undervalue how much of a impact The Shape of Jazz to Come had. He took the improvisation element of jazz to an extreme. Artists that take music to new levels tend to inspire others even if the music ...


6

It may come down to tradition, combined with historic technical limitations. Guitar strings used to be considerably thicker than they are now, making them considerably harder to bend - I think it was Eric Clapton first got the idea of moving all the strings down one, discarding the low E string & substituting the top E with a thinner banjo string, ...


6

Probably a couple of reasons why such lists don't abound is that: Any such list is always going to be tremendously incomplete. In general you can't get a sound perspective on a style with just one or two examples. You're never going to get general consensus about the selection you may pick in such an attempt. Anyway, I understand your perplexity and you ...


5

There's a rich tradition of musical exchange between "latin" and jazz, going back to Jelly Roll Morton, who talked about "The Spanish Tinge." Today, the phrase is more often stated as the "latin tinge," which ethnomusicologist John Storm Roberts used as the title of a book on the subject. Your question asks about Brazilian music, which generally isn't a ...


5

See the "Overview" section of Wikipedia's "Cool jazz" article. Quoted here: Broadly, "cool" refers to a number of post-war jazz styles employing a more subdued approach than that found in other contemporaneous jazz idioms. As Paul Tanner, Maurice Gerow, and David Megill suggest "the tonal sonorities of these conservative players could be compared to ...


5

Jazz is a challenging form of music by nature. It's technically demanding, it uses exotic chords and rhythms, it's dissonant and improvisational. Even when covering familiar material, it departs from the canonical melodies and harmonizations. Perhaps for this reason, while there have always been more pop-oriented, crowd-pleasing versions of jazz, the ...


5

I think what you're looking for is Miles Davis's Second Great Quintet, which, aside from Davis, featured four young, untried musicians: Ron Carter — bass Tony Williams — drums Herbie Hancock — piano Wayne Shorter — tenor saxophone About the Second Great Quintet, the Wikipedia article reads: The performance style of the Second Great Quintet was often ...


4

Darkside (Nicolas Jaar & Dave Harrington) is an exceptionally talented and unique duo. About a year ago I was lucky enough to see them at an intimate Brooklyn venue that no longer exists (RIP Glasslands). You'll have trouble finding another band quite like them, though it's probably fair to say they exhibit traits of trip-hop, electronica, downtempo, ...


4

After 5 months of searching, I have finally found both songs again!!! It's a collection of 3 disks called The PMG Companion Vol 1 (1976 - 1980). Disk 1, track 4: There Will Never Be Another You (Warren/Gordon) 12:55 Disk 2, track 7: Unidentified #4 8:58 This last one ended up containing the base theme for Metheny's album The Way Up. I'm so happy :)


4

Are you sure about this? Because this piece, according to Mays, was written not too long before being released. http://www.motu.com/newsitems/atnewsitem.2005-04-07.7801716143 If you look in the right margin, about 2/3 of the way down the page, you see a mini-interview with Mays where he states they wrote it just before recording it. An excerpt: Lyle ...


4

According to discogs, "Don't Play Me Cheap" by Louis Armstrong was recorded on April 26, 1933, and released a little under a year later, on April 4, 1934. Discogs also lists the song as being of the Jazz genre and Swing style. This recording date and style pairing seem to align with the Swing music Wikipedia page, which states that Swing started in the early ...


4

Given that Nina Simone is the only credited pianist on the album on which "I Loves You Porgy" first appears, her debut album Little Girl Blue, it's highly likely that she was accompanying herself on the album. Although album credits can be inaccurate, whether on purpose or not, the sole credit and the fact that she still aspired to be a concert pianist at ...


4

Art Tatum is primarily known as a Jazz artist. As bebop began to take control of jazz in the early 1950s, Tatum continued playing variations of the stride piano style, mostly at small clubs throughout the country. In 1953, Tatum tracked a record 124 solos for noted producer Norman Granz and while the sessions were hasty, they yielded material for ...


4

Lester Young / Charlie Parker / Dizzy Gillespie ‎– Early Modern: 1946 Concert Recordings Label: Milestone Records ‎– MSP 9035 Format: Vinyl, LP, Compilation Country: US Released: 1971 Genre: Jazz Style: Bop, Swing Miles Davis With Modern Jazz Quartet, The & Lester Young ‎– European Tour '56 With The Modern Jazz Quartet & Lester Young Label: ...


4

In my opinion this is more akin to bebop than swing. Tempo, improvisational style, and combo instrumentation are more in line with the bebop tradition (ala Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, early Miles Davis) than the swing tradition (e.g. Basie). That said, he was a member of Basie's band and it's difficult to deny those roots even listening to this tune ...


4

Bebop has frequent chord changes many notes in the melody and brisk tempos Cool has less frequent chord changes sparse melody and moderate tempos


4

The Girl from Ipanema was popularized in the US in the 60's by the saxophonist Stan Getz as part of his Bossa Nova influenced Jazz approach. Getz had a lyrical approach to playing the sax, cultivating a warm, mellow tone. In the 60's he got very interested in Brazilian music, particularly Bossa Nova, a slow tempo derivation of the syncompated Samba. He was ...


4

According to a discussion here, these are probably censored versions of the songs. EDIT: Answer from the Amazon support : The Clean version you see next to some of the Music titles means that the song/Album is edited out, like songs on the radio and does not contain any offensive content. Often swearing is taken out, lyrics deemed too violent for general ...


4

Floaters - Jimmy Fontanez/Media Right Productions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C9lMKLpmRUg


4

The history of the sitar in jazz, that is the fusion of the sounds of Indian classical music with Western jazz, dates back from the late-1950s or early-1960s when musicians trained in Indian classical music such as Ravi Shankar started collaborating with jazz musicians such as Tony Scott and Bud Shank. Later jazz recordings containing sitar music include ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible