5

The Police: Hungry for You (J'aurais Toujours Faim De Toi). Written mostly in French, apparently with the help of Trudie Styler, with whom Sting was having an affair at the time. Reference: https://www.songfacts.com/facts/the-police/hungry-for-you-jaurais-toujours-faim-de-toi


4

The Guinness World Records website reports that the song 'Golden Dreams of Gandhiji' by Dr. Kesiraju Srinivas was recorded in 125 different languages. It was released as a double album titled 'The Path of Mahatma Gandhi' on 2 December 2009.


4

I didn't quite get one word/phrase, but might be good enough for the shower ;) enjoy Halt dich fest, wir werden fliegen Träume siegen irgendwann einmal dein kleines Herz kannte nur Lügen du, ich bin ab heute für dich da so wie in Hollywood, Hollywood, Hollywood davon träum ich jede Nacht so wie in Hollywood, Hollywood, Hollywood wo das Glück den Siegern ...


3

I'm italian and this is the translation: Original lyrics: giro giro giro giro tondo caldo giro giro giro tondo soldi giro giro giro tondo ghiaccio giro giro giro tondo letto giro giro giro tondo notte giro giro giro tondo vento giro giro giro tondo matto giro giro giro tondo zitto giro giro giro tondo morto giro giro giro tondo ...


3

Building on Chris' and Angst's answers, the "Odu Ifá" (the sacred oral corpus in the Ifá religion) is composed of 256 liturgical poems. Each one is specified by a combination of two binary numerals each of four digits. Ogbe is: I I I I as opposed to Iwori: II I I II Eji means 2, so "Eji Iwori" would be two of Iwori: II I I II + II I I II Similarly, "...


3

Sources: the band's own website and wikipedia. ÌFÉ have connections to Yoruba Ifá religion and music, through founder Otura Mun who is a Babalawo or Ifá high priest. The Ifá religion has sacred writings known as the "Odu Ifá", : Eji-Ogbe is the name of a book within these writings, so it is a word in the Yoruba language. Yorubaland is the cultural region ...


3

I disagree with Angst answer on sayCet : As you can heay on this interview video, the woman on the right prononces it merely like you would prononce it in english (with a french accent of course). And the final "t" is sounded. Another example here with a better english accent.


3

"Ocoeur" is the alias of French musician Franck Zaragoza. It is, as you point out, derived from the French "au coeur". Since there is nothing on his biog page to indicate any other pronounciation, it is most likely pronounced as the French "au coeur". Edit: 25th August 2020 : for 'Saycet' answer to correct/amend my own answer ...


3

Bill Wyman (Rolling Stones of course) - (Si Si) Je Suis un Rock Star (1981) - Has various parts in French, and looking at the quality of those parts it's very hard to believe Mr Wyman is fluent! Je suis un rock star Je avais un residence Je habiter la A la south of France Voulez vous Partir with me? And come and rester la With me in France In fact earlier ...


2

My "translation", below, is based on the following sources: Arabic transliteration (Google search: scroll to the bottom of the lyrics and click "Show in Roman characters") Swedish lyrics (Subtitles in YouTube video) English translation of Swedish (Description of same YouTube video) There are other versions of this here and here. ARABIC ...


2

As requested by the OP and with due respect to @Brahadeesh for making me think of it.... In the 1990's, British band Kula Shaker had a number of hits that were written with a substantial part of the lyrics in Sanskrit. Apparently, frontman Crispian Mills was somewhat obsessed with Indian culture. Two of their 1996 Top 10 hits were called "Tattva" and "...


2

I managed to get a comment from El Huervo himself (which is cool in itself). In short, he thought that it meant "wolverine", but it turned out it means nothing. Name should be pronounced in a Spanish manner.


2

The lyrics itself are meaningless, but the language does have a name - it's called Gablish and was indeed invented by Yoko Kanno. She wrote several songs, that express a similar style, under the pseudonym Gabriela Robin. Mostly they sound like a language you may know, but than again they don't mean anything - at least not to the listener. I would dare to ...


2

I ended up just looking up some stuff by Czesław Niemen on YouTube. YouTube then suggested several other similar artists, after which things rolled along nicely.


2

If you listen carefully, the lyrics are actually made of up words from the title of the song. In fact, it's possible it was originally untitled, and the lyrics were used to identify it. Giro, giro, giro, giro tondo matto giro, giro, giro tondo caldo giro, giro, giro tondo According to Google, the title is Italian, and translates as "Crazy, ...


1

Assuming that the lyric is based on a literal latinised translation of phonetic Hebrew, the closest approximation of this lyric, which makes any sense to me in the context of the song, is: Struggling/dragging with a great burden. I can't point to any definitive source as this "translation", in its loosest sense, is from half remembered schooling and some ...


1

Building on Angst's research -- "Eji", "Og" and "Be" all seem to be syllables used in the rather complex Yoruba counting system. Although this is just speculation, it seems likely that this title is a math problem with an answer that is pronounced "Eji Ogbe", and that the number it denotes is either also the title of a sacred Yoruba book, or a homonym for ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible