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9

Prokofiev referred to the bird in Peter and the Wolf as simply 'the little bird'. "Of course we shall have the flute as a little bird." [†Schlifstein, p.450.] Although parakeets are smallish - especially the ones we in the UK call 'budgerigars' - as you say, they're not native to Russia. He doesn't try to imitate the actual sound of any of the animals ...


5

The Police: Hungry for You (J'aurais Toujours Faim De Toi). Written mostly in French, apparently with the help of Trudie Styler, with whom Sting was having an affair at the time. Reference: https://www.songfacts.com/facts/the-police/hungry-for-you-jaurais-toujours-faim-de-toi


4

A Google search gives the lyrics (via Musixmatch, see end of post), transliteration, and translation reproduced in full below. Listening to the original recording on YouTube, and following along with the transliteration, suggests that the transliterated lyrics are fairly accurate. As a double-check, I also ran the Google/Musixmatch lyrics through SYSTRAN, ...


4

Personally, I've always assumed it to be as you say, "From the get-go".


4

The line refers to British newspaper columnist, rock music journalist, television presenter, author, musician and political activist Garry Bushell. From Wikipedia: His scathing reviews of the early punk incarnation of Adam and the Ants led to him being name-checked, along with veteran NME writer Nick Kent, in the band's song "Press Darlings". ...


4

(caveat: I'm not a native English speaker) Your are not mistaken, there is a "vai". Actually, what I hear is: regardlessovi[pause]deology Your "vai" is actually the end of "of" (pronounced with an ending /v/) directly bound to the "i" (pronouced /aɪ/) of "ideology".


3

This gets a little bit into music terminology and musical form. When talking about different sections of music they are typical referred to by letters as seen here and here. You also need to take the previous line in to get the full context: Just because a record has a groove Don't make it it the groove So Sir Duke is talking about from the top of the ...


3

The BeatleBible states that the song expressed Lennon's views of the exploitation of the working class Lennon was disenchanted with the way he felt workers were used by the upper classes to build wealth, and were “doped with religion and sex and TV” to remain as an underclass. The same website carries a quotation from Lennon in which he says: "I hope ...


3

Bill Wyman (Rolling Stones of course) - (Si Si) Je Suis un Rock Star (1981) - Has various parts in French, and looking at the quality of those parts it's very hard to believe Mr Wyman is fluent! Je suis un rock star Je avais un residence Je habiter la A la south of France Voulez vous Partir with me? And come and rester la With me in France In fact earlier ...


3

Theresa Thomason, folks, on vocals!


3

I’ve worked with monstercat many many times. I know cloud pretty well, I’m fairly sure I can guess I’ll go ahead and say that this song is about suicide after losing a lover. I didn’t make this song with cloud, but I have before. I hope that answered your question. Cloud often refers to death as space, As well as, in the song Matt sings “I’ll find you in a ...


3

It's a hard song to understand unless you remember the ironic-nihilist, slacker culture of the times. At the time, Gen-X teenagers and young adults were dismissed by their elders as aimless, apathetic, self-destructive "losers." Rather than fight this labeling, artists like Beck chose to wear it proudly, as a badge of honor. Like much youth music, ...


3

I believe this is what you're looking for: Lola - The Way I Am It's VERY difficult to find anything about the artist, but I think this article is about the same person.


2

This reference provides the most plausible explanation for the reference to Raleigh. It explains the evolution of Lennon's lyric. An original lyric was: Although I choked, I'll have another cigarette, and blame Sir Walter Raleigh The lyric was then worked on to scan and to provide a rhyme with "upset" and "cigarette" .


2

It is not a missing verse. It is Mac singing off mic during the instrumental break, most likely to help himself keep time for when his lead vocals return at the end of the break. It was probably not intended to be part of the recording. The treatment of the song varies during live performances available on YouTube but none of them introduce a verse that may ...


2

As requested by the OP and with due respect to @Brahadeesh for making me think of it.... In the 1990's, British band Kula Shaker had a number of hits that were written with a substantial part of the lyrics in Sanskrit. Apparently, frontman Crispian Mills was somewhat obsessed with Indian culture. Two of their 1996 Top 10 hits were called "Tattva" and "...


2

For any combination of melody and text (song, aria, etc...) there are different approaches to the composition: The lyrics can come first. Most operas are written this way and a lot of musicals (although the composer and lyricist will often sit down together work out a way to make music and lyrics fit). The melody can come first, e.g. Elgar "Pomp and ...


2

"Peter Criss on the drums!", and then possibly a count-in "one...two...". You can hear the Peter Criss introduction on other recordings, like this one: https://youtu.be/rQzLnyToloE. (Edit: at 9:14-ish)


2

sounds like "Cats In The Cradle" to me, most popular version from Ugly Kid Joe:


2

My "translation", below, is based on the following sources: Arabic transliteration (Google search: scroll to the bottom of the lyrics and click "Show in Roman characters") Swedish lyrics (Subtitles in YouTube video) English translation of Swedish (Description of same YouTube video) There are other versions of this here and here. ARABIC ...


2

There are a variety of posts like the one in the OP that claim the song is intended as a Christian anthem. For example here, here, and (indirectly) here. However, Everything I've found directly attributable to Groban (that is, with a verifiable citation) gives no indication of what he has in mind when singing the song. He has acknowledged that he was raised ...


2

The answer is ... both. Dylan prefers "over"; everyone else sings "of". In the recording posted, this 1965 recording, this other 1965 recording, this 1971 recording, this 1975 recording, and this 1999 recording Dylan clearly sings "over". But in the original recording on Bringing It All Back Home, he sings "of". And &...


2

In context, I think the lyrics are much more positive than you're painting them. They were penned by the proudly eccentric Cee-Lo Green, and I read them primarily as a defense of his lifelong commitment to living as he sees fit, regardless of whether that puts him out of step with others, or with society as a whole. The start of the song describes losing his ...


2

Here it is!: It seems to be translated to 'Creating Love'. It seems to be a soundtrack for something in Korean, I assume from the TV show. I do not read nor speak Korean, so there is not much more information I could find outside of this: Title: 사랑 만들기 Album: 韩国M-net单曲榜13 Release date: 2010-04-21


2

Oxford Languages defines feminism as the advocacy of women's rights on the basis of the equality of the sexes. These lyrics have nothing to do with rights, and could, for the most part, be equally well sung by a man about a woman (or by someone of any gender about someone of any gender) so they don't seem in conflict with feminism. I'm not getting why you'...


2

There's a lot of music out there, but in terms of sticking to well-known musicians, a few come to mind: All the albums for both the Dutch progresive rock band Ayreon and the American neo-soul/hip-hop auteur Janelle Monae are fitted loosely into epic science-fiction narrative continuities. The plot for Ayreon's projects is more well-defined, and deals with a ...


1

Vocalist/keyboardist Alexis Taylor told the Sun newspaper that he thought this song contains the best lyrics he'd ever written. Taylor explained the album title to Slate magazine: "I got to thinking about relationships and how quite an important moment takes place in the dark. As human beings, we are all 'made in the dark' to some extent. I was ...


1

Although the first verse of the song refers to the Greek myth of Orpheus and Eurydice, the second verse refers to the Christian biblical Apocalypse. The Book of Revelation refers to Two Witnesses who appear during the Second Woe, a "wave" of attack by God's army. Please note that I am not able to find a discussion of "Talk"'s lyrics to ...


1

Those English lyrics are on the site musicmatch.com and they seem roughly correct: Mal bicho, your destiny's bad Mal bicho, voice marks your pride Mal bicho, a song that is played Mal bicho, is a song for always Mal bicho, who makes the wars Mal bicho, everything's lost Mal bicho, you love the man Mal bicho, and you don't give a damn


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