8

I like the way you think. It makes perfect sense on the surface. But the music industry and legalities surrounding it are complex. There are a few reasons why this practice has not become common in the music industry. First, many artists for one reason or another, do not wish to allow their music to be licensed or reproduced in a karaoke version. I ...


7

Spotify is notorious for underpaying artists. The margins for the artists are better when you purchase the music on iTunes or Amazon, but the best margins are on services specifically designed to channel more of the money to artists like Bandcamp. If you want a streaming service, Tidal claims to offer the best artist payouts in the streaming category. It'...


7

Whenever I really like an artist, I'll make sure I buy the album (usually off iTunes), although I'll still listen to them on Spotify. I think the best thing you can do in this situation is buy the album digitally, because there aren't physical production costs to it. In order to really support an artist, though, make sure you attend a concert if they have ...


6

This Fusion.net article answers your question better than I ever could (and also probably in more words than a StackExchange post would allow), but I'll summarize it here. It doesn't really matter when you buy an album, so much as where. As this article calculated, if a band with four members that writes their own songs sold 500,000 copies of an album at $...


6

When supportive artists are invited to work on an album they are featured on the record. It is more like a description of what happened rather than a status. The lead artist is the one responsible for the creation of the album or at least developed the inital idea/concept for the album. However artists can agree on different forms of attribution, like "...


5

This is a mix of my humble opinion and the result of some research: During the 80s decade the boundaries between pop, R&B, rock and rap started to be less strict, for example: A R&B and disco singer as Michael Jackson was considered at the first 80s, included a pop-rock song called Beat It (with the help of an Eddie Van Halen riff) in the same ...


5

The typical publishing agreement contract works like this (exact numbers may vary): The overall benefits of the song are split in two: 50% writer's income 50% publishing income Most often, the songwriter trades some or all of the publishing rights to a publishing company in exchange for a large sum of money --enough that Berry could have stopped being ...


4

Eligibility requirements for the US Grammys 2016 were… What are the eligibility requirements? For the 58th Annual GRAMMY Awards, albums must be released between Oct. 1, 2014 and Sept. 30, 2015. Recordings must be commercially released in general distribution in the United States, i.e. sales by label to a branch or recognized independent distributor,...


4

This is an interesting question, but I suspect the answers will be hard to come by without very dedicated research. I found the data for US GDP by Industry on this page. I'm not expert in this stuff, but in that file, potentially music related data comes in two categories: "Performing arts, spectator sports, museums, and related activities" and "Motion ...


4

Legally, band names are pretty much like... brand names (no pun intended). First of all a technicality, names are not copyrighted, they are trademarked and can also be registered. Legal details of course depend from country to country, but in general, like with any business, if you can show that you have been operating a business or selling a product using ...


4

This is pretty anecdotal & I have no hard references for some of the examples, however... Usually the first one to get a recognisable hit can force or even just persuade any others to change their name. I'm not sure this is even done using lawyers, usually the other band just gives in after one letter from the record company. This one I just "know to ...


4

It is the library which owns the publishing rights and agrees the any terms with the production. It will be in the library's own interests to gain a production credit as they are competing against other libraries. There's a good story of a number of composer's experiences with publishing libraries. As one composer suggests, if they want fame and recognition,...


4

I saw a YouTube video, I think Vsauce, where he crunched the numbers. I also just googled it and found this guy https://plus.maths.org/content/how-many-melodies-are-there. According to these numbers there are is a very high number of ways to permutate musical notes. The website comes to conclusion of There are around 82,500,000,000,000,000,000 melodies ...


3

I'm not sure about any possible technical usage in publishing credits, but typically "A in care of B" just means that B is doing nothing but passing it along to A, whereas "A on behalf of B" means that A is doing actual work of some sort as an authorized representative of B. So not only is the direction from representative to principle reversed, but one ...


3

In specific genres, this may be true. However, in genres where the singer is mostly acting as a host - such as in vaudeville or in hiphop - the female singer won't be judged as much. In others where the singer is the performer, there does seem to be a double standard. Rex Harrison was mocked for continuously talking his numbers but continued to be billed ...


3

The term "diva" is really a descendant of the prima donna ("first lady" = lead female role) in opera. Prima uomo means "first man," but this term is very rarely used compared to prima donna. I can't offer a definite answer for your main question, but I wonder if it might be related to genre. The genres in which female singers dominate have very different ...


3

My opinion is a song's true release date is the date it was published, not the date of it being played live on album or introduced as a single live. The true date is the date when it appears on CD or DVD or SACD, whatever.


3

No, not any more According to this Michael Jackson fan website http://www.mjjcollectors.com, this topic was specified in an agreement dated March 4th 1985. This letter signed by Michael Jackson states that the agreement lasted 18 months. USA for Africa shall be entitled to receive all such income accruing during the eighteen month period (. . .) no ...


3

Distribution companies can't get you on the radio. Traditionally, radio play is controlled by big labels with a lot of resources. Local, independent stations will often "break" new artists onto the airwaves, particularly local artists, but there are only a few of those left. Music distribution is how music gets delivered to the listener. ...


3

If you take a course in music appreciation you'll probably get some kind of certificate of participation. That's probably the closest you'll get to what you're looking for.


2

This site shows album sales broken down into genres in America. Is this of any use? It is something close to what you already have, but shows it up to 2014 (from 2008).


2

Actually, in jamaican reggae music, they do release the instrumental! Tradition, in jamaican reggae music, is mainly backing bands (e.g. Roots Radics, Sly & Robbie, The Skatalites, The Aggrovators...) recording riddims in studios. Lead singer artist then comes and records his song on that backing track. Riddim article on Wikipedia says : A given ...


2

The concept of a mix comes from the days of dub and disco when songs would be edited using mixing boards and tape to change the pace (especially in dub) or to change the length and ideal for mixing (especially in disco). The concept of a remix is to take the original tape and add or strip elements to the song to match the preference of the remixer. ...


2

jcbermu's detailed answer seems pretty definitive to me but I'd like to add a touch of cynicism to something which seems, and probably is for the most part, a generally inclusive and valuable phenomenon. Whenever I spot the 'featuring' thing, I always tend to mentally add 'desperately' (as in 'desperately featuring'). While there are more than enough ...


2

Music is a continuous remixing of the same concepts, people gets something that they listened in the past, and applying changes they can create something new. You can't think in terms of notes. Music is more complex than that, you have to include chords, rhythm and metric (chords per bar). It's not the same the A chord and the A7sus4 chord. A lot of pop ...


2

If a song is released as a single, that is its release date. Subsequent inclusion on an album does not change that date. For example, Blur released She's So High as a single in 1990; it was then included on their Leisure album, released in 1991. The release date of She's So High remains 1990. (source: Discogs)


2

I can think of two reasons, 1) demographics and 2) culture. First is sheer numbers. The number of Hispanic-Americans has risen from 10 million in 1970 to 50 million in 2010. In percentage terms, that's a rise from 5% of the U.S. population, to 17% over those 40 years.More to the point, it took that long for a generation of Spanish-speaking children to grow ...


2

Yes, very much so. I don't think that the previous answer is totally correct. The statement posted is valid enough, but it only extends to Jackson's own royalties due to him as a songwriter. It does not cover Lionel Richie's rights as co-writer, nor the record company' publishing rights. It's not clear whether this legal directive was binding on the 2010 ...


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