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5

It's Chopin's Prelude in B-flat minor, Op. 28, No. 16. Here's a video where it's performed just plain too damn fast.


5

This is Mendelssohn, Lieder ohne Worte, op. 53 no. 2 (a.k.a. "Song without Words" #20), compare youtube.


4

This is Ludovico Einaudi - Divenire, the quoted part starts around 2:00. A friend of mine plays this song. The original is much faster than the recording you supplied.


4

It's unclear if you're looking for the opus numbers or the numbering from 1 to 32, so I'll offer both. In order: 4 (Op. 7) 9 (Op. 14, No. 1) 15 (Op. 28) 9 (Op. 14, No. 1) 8 (Op. 13) 5 (Op. 10, No. 1) 1 (Op. 2, No. 1) 2 (Op. 2, No. 2) 30 (Op. 109) 4 (Op. 7) 22 (Op. 54) The images in your post are from the two volumes of the Beethoven Piano Sonatas ...


4

Wow, Shazam is all over the place. Not only is the piece not Chopin, his Op. 8 are not either of his two sets of etudes, and the Nos. 9 from both etude sets are in completely different keys, neither one of which is the one given in this recording! (Although, to be fair, the digital version in your clip has been transposed.) This piece is actually the final ...


4

Based on information on whosampled.com and this music website - (as translated by Google) Dr. Peacock and Sefa's "This life is lost" samples a piano melody by Ludovico Einaudi, called Una Matina, from the 2004 recording of the same name. maybe that's the connection ?


4

This is Gymnopédie no.1 by the French composer and pianist Eric Satie (1866-1925). Satie wrote mainly for the piano. Two of his sets of pieces, the Gymnopédies (1888)and the Gnossiennes (1889-1897) are by far his best known works. As far as I can tell, Jincheng Zhang used the version of the piece available from the YouTube Audio Library. There's no ...


4

It sounds like Mozart's piano sonata in A minor (K310). Link (Youtube).


4

The extract is from the third movement of Frédéric Chopin's Piano Sonata No.2 B-flat minor, Op.35. The sonata was published in 1840, but Chopin had composed this movement at least two years earlier. This movement is also known as his funeral march, in fact it was played at his own funeral (against his wishes). The first part of the movement is better known....


3

Regarding accuracy and completeness, the best source, hands down, is The Beatles: Complete Scores from Hal Leonard. The main drawback is the relatively small print—it's not a score you can put on a stand and play from in a dimly lit bar. They give full scores for all songs, showing the separate guitar parts, piano (if present), vocals, etc. I unfortunately ...


3

I think what you are looking for is a solo piano instrumental nostalgia standards ballad, which isn't necessarily a recognized genre, but it is a findable type of music. Basically, "nostalgia" standards are lightly jazz-influenced classic popular American songs of the 20s through 50s --also known as the "Great American Songbook". As Time Goes By There ...


3

At the risk of being a little bit on the nose, how about "Ragtime" from the musical "Ragtime"? http://www.musicnotes.com/sheetmusic/mtd.asp?ppn=MN0055431 https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=eWbIsYtDFKY


3

It's definitely in the style of Chopin, but I don't recognize it as Chopin. The soundtrack only lists one Chopin piece (Op. 10, No. 5) as part of a "piano battle," but this isn't that piece. All this to say I'd guess it's an original composition by Chou.


3

The OP of the Music.SE submission provided an answer in the comments there, so I'll share it here to at least take this post off of the "unanswered questions" list: The piece is an arrangement (by Vika Yermolyeva) of System of a Down's "Toxicity."


3

This is "La Cinquantaine" ("Golden Wedding Anniversary") by French romantic composer Jean Gabriel-Marie, typically performed on cello and piano. I was able to locate it by reproducing your very accurate rendition with this service: http://www.musipedia.org/


3

This excerpt is from the piece "Laideronnette, Impératrice Des Pagodes" by the French composer Maurice Ravel (from 0:40 in the Youtube link).


3

The American composer Elliott Carter (b.1908) composed this piece, one of the twelve "Epigrams" for piano, violin and cello in 2012, shortly before he died. He was one of the most highly regarded 'serious' composers of the twentieth century. The title gives a clue to the structure of the pieces: they are all short and pithy. It's not necessary to have any ...


3

It's from Yann Tiersen's Amélie soundtrack. The title is Comptine d'un autre été, l'après-midi. Listen here.


3

The music is taken from the opera "Norma" by Vincenzo Bellini. This arrangement is called "Fantaisie brillante sur 'Norma'", opus 65 by Ignace Xavier Joseph Leybach (1817-1891). Here you can find the score. Many pianolas have used a roll of this composition: Computer simulated piano, from 1918 Ampico Piano roll n. 55927, perhaps played by Marguerite ...


3

C-sharp minor is not a particularly rare key. If we take the Wikipedia page Compositions by Key, count the compositions linked and turn this into a table we get the following: (Note: this data is probably wildly inaccurate. If you can provide a link to better statistical data, please do so in a comment.) sharps/ key # key # key # ...


3

The first few notes originate from "Für Elise" by Beethoven, see Wikipedia for a recording


3

This is "Nuvole Bianche" by Ludovico Einaudi. A Recording on YouTube Composer information on Wikipedia


2

Some research on the name Takács suggests that the composer is Jenö Takács. There is a website devoted to him and his life and music here : http://www.takacsjeno.com/ From there (english language version of website), searching for solo piano pieces shows a piece called "XIX. Die Kuckucksuhr [The Swiss Cuckoo Clock]" in a collection called "Für mich [For Me]....


2

OP found the answer and wrote it in the question. Here it is: First of all, allow me to thank you for your answers. The one I was looking for is this Helena Paparizou' Teardrops.


2

As mentioned by suraj there is the original by Five Finger Death Punch, but the piano melody also, in my opinion, sounds similar to the intro in Everybody's Fool by Evanescence. Sources: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_l4Ab5FRwM&feature=youtu.be https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnBYWI8pxmU


2

The effects you're asking about are built into the piano itself, activated by pedals. So, "prepared" in the early 19th-century sense (specialty pedals were all the rage), but not in the modern John Cage sense. This concert review (https://bachtrack.com/review-wigmore-hall-andreas-staier-diabelli-variations) mentions the pedals involved (other CD ...


2

The song is "All Kinds of Everything". It was written by Derry Lindsay and Jackie Smith and, performed by the Irish singer Dana, it won the Eurovision Song Contest in 1970.


2

Pretty confident you're looking for Heart And Soul. I remember they played it on an episode of Lost, and at least on Stuart Little.


2

I think I actually found it: It's Chopin's "Nadia Elle Nocturne Op.9 No1 in B Flat Minor" https://youtu.be/EeQji68cL0E


2

The name of this song is At The Bea (S) T Of The Drums Genre: Synth Pop By: My terminal and the trip & Gehard Graf Listen preview


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