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No particular marketing campaign was necessary for vinyl --like many older technologies that were once ubiquitous, it has become a beloved, nostalgic niche product for aficionados. As one of those, I would submit that the reasons are threefold: Psychological - A vinyl record is a solid, physical, tangible object --it's sturdy and durable. For people who ...


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Early Masters were made on analog equipment, and so yes, vinyl was made for those Masters. No matter how good your digital music may be, it's still 1's and 0's. On or Off. Music has a lot of "grey" in it, where it's neither on nor off, or simultaneously on and off. Analog music will always be superior to digital because of that truth. Now, if ...


1

The 'Audiophool' magazines and sites certainly perpetrate the myth, in a symbiotic relationship with their advertisers. (For a good laugh, take a look at Russ Andrews' shop.) A veteran British rocker recently accompanied a CD release with a high-priced "lathe cut" limited-edition vinyl version, it sold out in a day! So there's definitely a market ...


4

This might come across as a tad cynical ;) Personally, I feel it's that people, given sufficient peer pressure, can easily be convinced to fool themselves. No need for marketing pressure. Most people don't own a system of sufficient quality to actually be able to tell the difference, on a blind test. Few people could even tell the difference on a good system....


1

I find the following simple, straightforward, and very appealing (list first, videos follow) Anette Kruse: solo voice, self-accompanied with light guitar Danish National Radio Choir: uncluttered arrangement, nicely harmonized Niels-Henning ├śrsted Pedersen (bass) with Oscar Peterson (piano): straightforward statement, nothing flashy Scott Hamilton Quartet [...


2

If she records them, she'll almost certainly release them. Otherwise, what's the point? It's not unprecedented --a number of other artists have rerecorded their old work, when they've been unable to regain the rights to the earlier recordings. Typically, it's older artists who are just looking for a way to gain a bit of money off their faded glory. ...


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