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6

Yes it does boost a song popularity most times, artist/record labels do to give their songs an appeal to a wider audience. It became popular from the 80s, as major artist and record labels began to see value in commissioning remixes of their music. According to an article from Computer Music, Oct 2017. It list 6 types of remix. Official remix The ...


5

If a remix by the same band would count, then Frankie Goes to Hollywood - 'Relax' might take some beating. The original recording did almost nothing on either side of the Atlantic, yet the remix became the 7th best-selling single in UK history. Apparently, the only remaining 'samples' from the original in the remix are some vocals & a 'splash' sample. ...


4

At the risk of trying to answer my own question, here's one candidate I had forgotten about, Simon and Garfunkel's The Sound of Silence. To quote Wikipedia: The album was a commercial failure and led to the duo breaking apart, with Simon returning to England and Garfunkel to his studies at Columbia University. In spring 1965, the song began to attract ...


4

That's Antares Autotune, processing an enveloped repeating sample. It's a sweeping arpeggio - that particular technique is the same you so often hear in American pop R&B these days. It could also be a Vocoder, but I'd wager my ruples on Autotune.


3

This is the Peter Schilling and Bomm-Bastic Major Tom ‘94 (English Version Chillout Mix) Here is another video with accompanying jacket artwork. I also confirmed it on my audio streaming service (Amazon if it matters).


3

The Beatles album, Let it Be… Naked from 2003 could arguably be considered the 'original' of the Let It Be album, recorded in 1969 & then shelved; later remixed & added to by Phil Spector in 1970, after the band's split. The unqualified claim is that Paul McCartney didn't like the 'over-produced' Spector version & wanted to release it in its ...


2

It definitely sounds like a vocal sample processed through something, maybe a Pitch-Shifter plugin and a Tremolo plugin. I guess the pitch was changed either by a knob or a pedal maybe.


2

As mentioned in the comments it could be synonymous with Bubble Gum Pop music: Lightweight catchy pop music It was simple, melodic, and light as feather -- neither the lyrics or the music had much substance. Wikipedia Since Bubble gum pop can be refered to as simply bubble gum. A bubble gum mix could refer to a collection of bubble gum music or ...


2

I am pretty sure this has nothing to do with the recording company as they handle all licensing for their artists song repertoire through a PRO. Usually you obtain what is known as a "use license" from a PRO (Performance rights organization) and you pay a fee to them which goes to the original artist for the rights to use their song. Each case is different ...


2

The remix is done in the style that was popular in the 90s called big beat. It was basically breakbeat with very straightforward grooves sampled. The samples were stacked in a fashion to create a noisy but robust sound that invited the dancers to do torsion dances that were familiar from rock n roll. Big names in this genre were Fat Boy Slim and Chemical ...


1

A quick look on Whosampled shows that there is a 2019 cover of the song by "Majestic featuring Patti Low". Seems likely to be what you heard.


1

Remixing is a way to drive additional sales, and gain a new audience for an already recorded song, usually by adding some element that is "missing" in the original. There are several different types of remixes, and they have different purposes and audiences. Dance remix - These are some of the most common and popular remixes. Typically a pop artist will ...


1

Found from the voice of its author during a radio show Provenzano - Folegandros https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EO-XhETd7g8


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This is a "deep house" remix. Deep house is a dance music genre with a minimalist, electronic influenced sound. Personally, I think of it as a "lonely," "after midnight" type of sound. The larger "house" genre of music developed from music played at house parties in Chicago in the early 1980's. Like disco before it, it is generally considered to have ...


1

Google Play: Explicit Clean iTunes: Explicit Clean


1

I fully agree with topo's answer, though on many occasions I've known a remix to be done initially without any permission, just to see if the track will gain any traction on the dance floor, as a white label. Only if it does see some good feedback do the record company then go to the copyright owners for permission, based on the 'if it doesn't sell, no-one ...


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