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11

Most of the Young Americans sessions, which began on August 11, 1974, were at Sigma Sounds Studios in Philadelphia, where the producer/songwriter team of Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff recorded the likes of The O'Jays, Harold Melvin & The Blue Notes, and Billy Paul, among others, on their Philadelphia International Records label. In addition, famed Philly ...


4

Wheat's excellent answer covers the context, but read on for an (admittedly subjective) evaluation of the musical differences: R&B has encompassed many different styles over its lifetime, and continues to be a term in current usage today. In general, it has typically meant the style of vocals-oriented pop music most popular among "urban" (black) ...


4

The liner notes for Trio credit this to "Roebuck Staples/Wesley Westbrooks". Roebuck was "Papa" Staples, the founder of the Staples Singers. Wesley has various credits on discogs. He was a musician in the jazz and gospel traditions, and subject of a biog by Dick Weissman ("Wes Westbrooks: A Life In and Out of Gospel Music and Jazz") which is mentioned in ...


3

Soul music started as a secularized form of gospel music, and tended to retain from its roots a certain spiritual quality and concern with moral uplift, although it also added a physical sensuality, and often dealt with themes of romance, lust, and occasionally vice. Although the genre began in the 1950's, with artists like Ray Charles and Sam Cooke, it ...


1

This is a subgenre of a subgenre of a subgenre! The larger subgenre is called Vaporwave and here's what has been said about it: Vaporwave is a microgenre of electronic music and an Internet meme that emerged in the early 2010s.[16] The style is defined by its appropriation of 1980s and 1990s mood music styles such as smooth jazz, elevator music, R&B, ...


1

I can clearly hear a snippet of "Come Into My Life" by Joyce Sims - but it sounds a bit like a sample rather than a remix.


1

The track I was thinking of was Heat Wave by Martha Reeves & The Vandellas. The rhythm is a little different, but the notes of the repeating verse riff are very similar.


1

If you're not specifically looking for Japanese music, the style of that particular song sounds heavily influenced by American "soft rock" of the 1970's. You might look up Karen Carpenter (who has a similar vocal register) or Carole King.


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