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9

There are a couple differences between the Barrett and Gilmour eras of Pink Floyd. One of the biggest differences was that when Barrett was in Floyd, he was pretty much the lead composer of the band, whereas after Barrett left, composing was more evenly distributed, at least initially. So essentially Barrett-era Floyd was Barrett's band, to the point where ...


5

My first thought is "coda". From the New Oxford American Dictionary: coda |ˈkoʊdə| noun Music the concluding passage of a piece or movement, typically forming an addition to the basic structure. the concluding section of a dance, especially of a pas de deux, or the finale of a ballet in which the dancers parade before the audience. ...


5

Yes, this song is a 100th birthday tribute to Frank Sinatra, as confirmed by the band's Instagram post: Frank Sinatra turns 100 this year. I attach his music to so many memories: Opening presents on Christmas day, my grandparents teaching the rest of the family to swing dance, watching “Who Framed Roger Rabbit” with my siblings (Sinatra makes a cameo in ...


5

Cool jazz is a style of jazz that arose as a sort of response to the growing popularity in bebop. Bebop featured fast-paced, syncopated, energetic music and frantic improvised solos. Cool jazz, in contrast, had a mellow and emotionally subtle "coolness" about it. There is still much melodic and harmonic complexity to it but you still won't see the same use ...


4

Bebop can in general be characterized by the following stylistic elements: fast tempos complex, highly syncopated rhythms advanced harmony using chords with added higher intervals (9ths, 11ths, 13ths), diminished and augmented chords, etc. an emphasis on improvised solos using higher intervals of chords, altered scales and chromaticism in improvisations. ...


4

I always thought an "anthem" was sort of like a "musical voice". The lyrics are on-point, and the music inspires courage, elation or pride. I mean, The Who's song Baba O'Riley is considered an anthem. For a deeper look at anthems and what makes a song an anthem, check out this article on NPR: The Good Listener: What Makes An Anthem? To quote the last ...


4

You may be looking for "outsider music". Daniel Johnston, who passed away earlier this week, was perhaps the most famous modern "outsider artist." Outsider music (from "outsider art") is music created by self-taught or naïve musicians. The term is usually applied to musicians outside the music establishment or who exhibit childlike qualities, and ...


4

Thunderstruck has some good hammer on and pull offs. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5iTQf5PDyY


3

In other contexts, away from religious or national anthems, to qualify as an "anthem", it has to be one or more of the following : uplifting, strongly identified with a group or individual, great chorus that will stand being sung badly. For example : "Something inside so strong", "Forever Young", "Someone like you", "Summer of 69"....


3

Not sure if there's a true scientific answer to this. In my opinion, I think a some of it has to do with the shuffle. This is when a pair of eighth notes, for instance, are played as a sixteenth and a dotted eighth. This brings a gravity to the to the second note. Add to that a leading eighth note, and that third note draws the listener to it. If we repeat ...


3

The defining characteristic of ragtime music is a specific type of syncopation in which melodic accents occur between metrical beats. This results in a melody that seems to be avoiding some metrical beats of the accompaniment by emphasizing notes that either anticipate or follow the beat ("a rhythmic base of metric affirmation, and a melody of metric denial" ...


3

In it's broadest sense, the term for this kind of repetitive accompaniment is ostinato: a repeated bass figure over which a melody occurs. Ostinato, however, can refer to a whole repeated sequence of notes or chords; it need not be a single chord. Stylistically, the songs you're asking about have their roots in traditional New Orleans jazz. For example, ...


3

I found one article that might be promising. I accessed it through the online database Academic Search Premier, through my University library. Citation: Beaster-Jones, Jayson. “A.R. Rahman and the Aesthetic Transformation of Indian Film Scores.” South Asian Popular Culture, vol. 15, no. 2/3, July 2017, pp. 155–171. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1080/14746689.2017....


2

It is normally played by small groups. The typical ensemble is formed of two horns and a rhythm section (quintet), but other common sizes ranged from trio to septet. The classic bebop combo consisted of saxophone, trumpet, double bass, drums and piano. Bebop musicians employed several harmonic devices not typical of previous jazz. Complicated harmonic ...


2

It's basically a slower "brutal death metal" with emphasis on slamdowns and breakdowns. That's probably all it really is, so you can do a lot with it and it can still be called "slam death" if you just follow the basics, combine it, or whatever.


2

The term you are looking for is 'One of the best bands of 21st century' but i guess it's safe to say they are a progressive metal band since they don't always go full on death metal and rely on lot of stuff such as groove and cannot be categorised into one single genre.


2

So, after quite some time, yes, Gojira is progressive death metal. Source: youtube comments on their videos.


2

This is a musical interpolation. The term has several related meanings, but this is one of them. an abrupt change of musical elements... [followed by a] resumption of the main theme. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interpolation_(music) You can think of it broadly as a song, or a portion of a song, inserted into another, stylistically distinct ...


2

@Angst has correctly traced this back to New Orleans (thanks for doing the underlying research).However, it is nearly impossible to search music just by "New Orleans" alone, since New Orleans has such a rich, diverse and full musical history, and is arguably the birthplace of what we know as "jazz." I'd suggest "jazz dirge," "blues dirge," or "New Orleans ...


1

One classic use of this style of piano is on "A Day in the Life" by the Beatles from the "Sgt. Pepper" album. The link is to the part where that piano riff starts, but it's worth listening from the beginning.


1

The radiohead fandom site entry for this song : states After listening to a demo of the song, trumpeter and bandleader Humphrey Lyttelton suggested arranging it in the style of a New Orleans jazz funeral. He described the song as: "[starting] with me doing a sort of ad-libbed, bluesy, minor key meandering, then it gradually gets so that we're ...


1

This is Indie Pop, a style that developed in the mid 90s and was big in the early 2000s. You can still find a lot of it, but not generally on the radio. Here's a brief history of it: In the 80s, the dominant pop sound was highly produced, and filled with synthesizers, power guitars, saxophones and drum machines. In reaction, new styles came into style in ...


1

This is gospel piano, a traditional style for religious music from the black American church that has a long and influential history, in parallel with secular black American musical styles such as jazz, the blues and soul. Like other black American music, it has roots in traditional African musical styles. However, there are many different kinds of gospel ...


1

It's Japanese Indie music. As per this quote: A collaborative project initiated by session musician and long standing member of the Japanese indie scene, Ken Takehisa. With 11 musicians taking part, the artist sent recordings of not just melodies and chords, but also scrapes, noise and amplifier feedback for everyone to break apart use as the ...


1

Just adding my two cents here-- the reference in all matters metal, namely the Metal Archives, describes Gojira as Progressive/Groove/Death Metal, that is, a mix of prog metal, groove metal and death metal. The nuance is subtle with Progressive Groove/Death Metal, where the music is groove/death metal that is progressive, not exactly the same. The Metal ...


1

The following is from The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music (Third Edition). The English-speaking Protestant Churches’ equivalent of the Latin motet, from which it sprang. … It constitutes in ordinary churches the one great occasion when the choir alone undertakes the duty of song, and when an elaborate vocal setting impossible and unsuitable in other ...


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