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I found one article that might be promising. I accessed it through the online database Academic Search Premier, through my University library. Citation: Beaster-Jones, Jayson. “A.R. Rahman and the Aesthetic Transformation of Indian Film Scores.” South Asian Popular Culture, vol. 15, no. 2/3, July 2017, pp. 155–171. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1080/14746689.2017....


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In it's broadest sense, the term for this kind of repetitive accompaniment is ostinato: a repeated bass figure over which a melody occurs. Ostinato, however, can refer to a whole repeated sequence of notes or chords; it need not be a single chord. Stylistically, the songs you're asking about have their roots in traditional New Orleans jazz. For example, ...


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As PiedPiper noted, you tend to hear a version of this style frequently in Beatles' songs, such as "Hey Jude", "Penny Lane" and "Lady Madonna". A great non-Beatles example of this style with more of the uptempo mood you're looking for would be "5th Beatle" Billy Preston's "Nothing from Nothing". It's ...


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One classic use of this style of piano is on "A Day in the Life" by the Beatles from the "Sgt. Pepper" album. The link is to the part where that piano riff starts, but it's worth listening from the beginning.


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Just adding my two cents here-- the reference in all matters metal, namely the Metal Archives, describes Gojira as Progressive/Groove/Death Metal, that is, a mix of prog metal, groove metal and death metal. The nuance is subtle with Progressive Groove/Death Metal, where the music is groove/death metal that is progressive, not exactly the same. The Metal ...


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