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5

In the video, there are several dances represented. But generally this is swing dancing and they teach it at swing dance clubs. The first paired-dances you see in the video are variations of lindy hop (a member of the 8-counts) and in the latter you see east coast swing (a member of the 6-counts.) I personally prefer the Lindy Hop because the steps are ...


4

A lot of what we think of as "old time" vocals was due to the very limited frequency response of the old microphones that were used at that time. The same thing applies to telephone audio in the pre-digital era. A few minutes of experimentation with a parametric equaliser and you can easily find the band of frequency response that sounds authentic as an "...


3

In this particular case, and for many electro-swing songs, the voice is actually a sample of a genuinely vintage song: http://lyrics.wikia.com/wiki/Lil_Hardin_Armstrong:Oriental_Swing This is Lil Hardin Armstrong, Louis Armstrong's second wife, singing "The Oriental Swing." (Part of the tip-off that this is an actual old song are the non-PC lyrics) ...


2

Not sure if there's a true scientific answer to this. In my opinion, I think a some of it has to do with the shuffle. This is when a pair of eighth notes, for instance, are played as a sixteenth and a dotted eighth. This brings a gravity to the to the second note. Add to that a leading eighth note, and that third note draws the listener to it. If we repeat ...


2

It's called Shake Down by Gavin Luke. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q_-uV3HzkII


1

This is pretty close stylistically to the what the Benny Goodman Big Band were doing in the 1930s. Sing, Sing, Sing is one typical example of the style. If you like this, you might the bands of Artie Shaw, Duke Ellington, Count Basie or Cab Calloway. All of this music is available from any good music streaming service. For an introduction to the swing music ...


1

The song is a pastiche of early jazz styles, and is perhaps most influenced by the pre-swing early jazz sound called "Dixieland" or "Hot Jazz." Originating in the African-American dance bands of New Orleans, the style is anchored by a fast steady rhythm line (which in your sample is taken by the repetitive chords on the piano, but which would have originally ...


1

It's a sort of pseudo 1930's type swing. Some of it sounds similar to recordings that Benny Goodman made around that time. If you like this, you should listen to any of his recordings (nearly all of them are good) either with his orchestra or his quartet. You might also like Artie Shaw or maybe the Duke Ellington Orchestra. Try starting with Benny Goodman's "...


1

I just found it. It is from Swing Republic - No no no


1

Well, if you're talking Sinatra and New York the obvious song is New York New York Chicago and My Kind of Town are about Chicago


1

This may sound strange, but the best way to find the count is often to follow the main melody, the lead vocals if there are any. To get to grips with this song my suggestion would be: listen to the song from the beginning and - in your mind - sing along using only the sentence "in a mellow tone 2 3 4 5 in a mellow tone 2 3 4 5" and keep repeating it ...


1

I have had similar experiences with trying to find the 1. I find it helps to remember that the heavy strokes on the snare are always on the 2 and the 4. The bass drum seems to act as only an accent on the upright bass so you are going to rely on the bass to tell what the 1 is. And part of the swing in swing is noticing that the bass has a slight bias ...


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