6

In this context Ben Folds "on top of the beat" is referring to Scott pushing the beat a little, i.e. getting a fraction ahead or rushing a bit, but it's only something you'd notice if you listen very closely. Scott is probably nervous and sometimes when he's singing a rhythmically faster passage it's not quite synchronized with the rest (around 2:00). The ...


4

These are normally called 'rehearsal numbers' or 'rehearsal figures'. You're correct: the conductor will say "from number/figure 184" or just "from 184" or even "184!". Often rehearsal letters are used instead of numbers (rehearsal numbers and letters are referred to as 'rehearsal marks'), and sometimes every measure is numbered individually in a small font. ...


3

Would "reinterpretation" be the word you're looking for? "Weird Al" Yankovic - My Bologna (Audio) - YouTube is a parody, not a real cover, but he's used the accordion to play many other songs that were never intended for such an instrument. Or Johnny Cash - Hurt (Official Music Video) - YouTube, which is a cover, of the Nine Inch Nails ...


3

The bar before rehearsal number nine is in 3/2 and the problem is Stravinsky can't decide whether to conduct half notes ("in three") or quarter notes ("in six"). "One bar for nothing in four" means he's going to give them four silent beats before they start (i.e. a count-in). He announces that he's going to conduct the bar in three ("the bar before nine is ...


2

Rehearsal marks without doubt, for bar numbers their difference is too small. See also this question; it is a bit unusual, that the rehearsal marks follow so close to each other, since 3rd bar after xxx is also frequently used. I have not yet encountered three-digit ones. Rehearsal marks may also use single or at worst double letters and be surrounded by ...


1

Would likely be slang/word play on "very suspect" as the line refers to explaining just how deep shit can get, not literally but metaphorically with double meaning.


1

That aren't measure numbers but rehearsal marks. They can signal beginning of solos, difficult sections, or any useful starting place to rehearse. To allow some freedom and for quicker finding of marks, frequent placement is recommended. The person conducting rehearsal can indeed say: "let's start again from 39" and the players easily find where that is. It'...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible