5

According to this chart, R&B pop icon Barry White's voice went all the way down to F#1(!) on his version of War's "Low Rider". White was famous for his smooth basso profundo. White was a big-name star in the 1970s with a number of #1 R&B hits. The album with "Low Rider" (Staying Power) was nominated for two Grammy awards in 1999. It's true, ...


5

This was considered pop at the time (it was in the top-20, it even made it to no.1 in the UK) "I Was Born Under a Wandering Star" sung by Lee Marvin. Goes down to Db2. This is more R&B, but was also in the pop charts at the time: "Proud Mary" by Ike and Tina Turner. It's more than just a harmony part he's singing and it goes down to F#2. A lot of ...


4

The reason is the different vocal techniques used by women in classical and pop music. Male singers mostly use similar techniques in both genres. The higher part of their range is preferred, particularly in solo singing. In classical music women sing in head voice which fits naturally about an octave above a male voice. The most important difference in ...


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