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15

It's not because of fidelity I'll start by discarding one reason: fidelity. Fidelity is the ability of a system to reproduce a signal with the least amount of change. High fidelity means little to no change is being induced, low fidelity means too many change is being induced. Perfect fidelity means the signal is being reproduced perfectly, without change ...


7

Spotify is notorious for underpaying artists. The margins for the artists are better when you purchase the music on iTunes or Amazon, but the best margins are on services specifically designed to channel more of the money to artists like Bandcamp. If you want a streaming service, Tidal claims to offer the best artist payouts in the streaming category. It'...


7

Whenever I really like an artist, I'll make sure I buy the album (usually off iTunes), although I'll still listen to them on Spotify. I think the best thing you can do in this situation is buy the album digitally, because there aren't physical production costs to it. In order to really support an artist, though, make sure you attend a concert if they have ...


7

Ever try rolling a joint on a CD cover? ;o) But seriously... There is a wonderful comparison over on the Audioholics site that breaks this down much further than I can. To me, however, I will just state that vinyl sounds... warmer. My ears respond much better to vinyl than to MP3 for sure, even at the best bitrates. And sometimes music doesn't feel ...


6

Of course, the best way to listen to music is live but, due to convenience, music is recorded. Vinyl (and tape cassettes) are an analogue format where there is no distinct difference when (for example) a note ascends the scales. On the other hand, CD's and MP3's are digital formats that are 'sampled' at different bit rates. Therefore, for people with well ...


4

It would have been an Edison or Columbia wax cylinder, ca. 1895 or so. The first few years of the phonograph were mostly about using it as a dictation machine, so it was sold with blank wax cylinders. (The first surviving cylinder recording of an identifiable piece of music is from about 1888, but it was an amateur "home" recording of a rehearsal at London's ...


4

There are many reasons vinylphiles present: music originally pressed on vinyl was engineered to sound good on vinyl, vinyl carries a wider frequency bandwidth than CD, no digital sampling 'blip'. Of course, CDs are now obsolete and we're not stuck with 16 bit audio at 44.1k that suddenly goes flat below 20Hz and above 20kHz, so those arguments aren't ...


3

5.1 never got real traction in music, it's purely a home theater thing now. But, Cinemas worldwide recently started to adopt 3D audio formats like DTS-X and Dolby-Atmos and Auro3D. That lead to enthusiasts and early adopters having the same setup now in the living room, all major receiver manufacturers sell those amplifiers. Downside is you have to have ...


2

This is a musical interpolation. The term has several related meanings, but this is one of them. an abrupt change of musical elements... [followed by a] resumption of the main theme. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interpolation_(music) You can think of it broadly as a song, or a portion of a song, inserted into another, stylistically distinct ...


2

Older and obsoleted technologies often make a comeback in a boutique, niche form that is higher quality, higher cost, and aimed at a smaller, luxury audience, as opposed to their earlier, mass-consumption iterations. Similar renaissances are being experienced right now by physical-film cameras, paper journals, vintage typewriters and even filament ...


2

There is also DVD-A, which takes advantage of 5.1. However, there's a deeper issue here. First of all, the proliferation of Hip-Hop, which (let's face it) doesn't really utilize instruments the way, say, Jazz or Progressive Rock does. It's a beat, more often than not in a live setting it's a DJ spinning while singers lay down vocals. There's really no ...


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