The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
5

Was there a specific artistic event or change that led to that? Yes. It was called Punk. It arrived in 76, though at that time was something you saw on TV & read about in the papers rather than were actively involved in. By 77 that had changed. You couldn't 'slow transition' from rock to punk, the clothes & hair wouldn't let you. I was in the 6th ...


3

Radio stations usually have to pay every time they play a song, or pay for a certain amount of playtime, but also have to pay an initial licensing fee to be able to play the songs at all, so to limit costs they only purchase a small number of song licenses. People in general want to hear the most popular songs, and want some consistency in their music, so ...


2

The most obvious answer is the shift in time signature. The entire song up to that point is in 4/4, then they change to playing in 7/4. Less conventional time signatures are very common in progressive rock and metal, the latter of which I’d say this more closely resembles. I don’t really listen to prog metal, so unfortunately I can’t give you much deeper ...


2

Instead of searching specifically for literature concerning Soft Machine and Gong I suggest that you look into The Canterbury Scene instead. The Canterbury scene (or Canterbury Sound) is a subgenre of, or sibling to, progressive rock. The term describes a loosely defined style of music created by a number of improvisational musicians, some of whom were ...


2

See the wikipedia entry for prog. Folk elements, or blending of influences, and complicated arrangements are also part of the prog thing. The twelve-string intro, CSNY-type harmonies....then a more full-tilt blues-rock section, bluesy guitar solo, power chords and so on - it's quite a complicated song. I know what you mean with your question - I'm of that ...


1

You may enjoy the arrangements made by the Uri Caine ensemble released on this live CD. They don't fit any of your genre recommendations exactly, but they're interesting arrangements nonetheless. You can hear the tracks in this YouTube playlist. Lastly, you may be interested in the term "Wagnerian rock."


1

My wife and I heard this song tonight (I found this thread trying to Google to see who it was). We also thought it sounded like Robin Trower, or maybe Pat Travers. At first she thought it might be Joe Bonamassa. Our local radio station is unmanned on Saturday nights but I'll email them on Monday. (edit) The song we heard Saturday night was Voyager by Gamma, ...


1

Is it Grand Funk Railroad's Closer to Home (more info here)? Matches: - 70's progressive rock - Song about a man and his ship - Ocean noises


1

It's tough to prove a negative in this case, but in looking through LP scans on Discogs of all Kansas's early albums up to and including 1979's Monolith, I haven't found any mention whatsoever of "White Rabbit". Most of the 1970s LPs do have "Special Thanks" type sections though, so perhaps he was thanked under a different name? I'm assuming "White Rabbit" ...


1

It looks very much like the Moody Blues were the first according to this article: A brief history of progressive rock Prog Rock finds its sources in the latter half of the 60’s. In 1966, the Moody Blues came out with their third album, the first with Justin Hayward and John Lodge, entitled “Days of Future Passed”, the first Pop or Rock album to be ...


1

The Chambers Brothers were a well-known band from that general time period that fit the "[X] Brothers" format. They are generally classified as psychedelic, but can arguably be considered early forerunners of prog. "[X] and the [Y]" is a long-standing standard way of naming a band that has a separate identity than the lead singer. But there's no well-...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible